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44 Cards in this Set

  • Front
  • Back
apophatic
Obtained through negation.
apodictic
Clearly established, beyond dispute.
noetic
Of or relating to mental activity or the intellect.
targum
From Aramaic for interpretation. Ancient Aramaic paraphrase of the Hebrew Bible.
pleonastic
The use of more words than are necessary to convey meaning.
encomium
A speech or piece of writing that praises something or someone.
diacritic
(1) Mark, as in naïve, to distinguish a separate syllable.

(2) Natural Break...end of foot coincides with end of line.
somatic
Of or relating to the body as distinct from the mind.

Antonym: noetic.
adventitious
Occurring by chance, accidental, fortuitous.
homologies
From homologous, having the same relation, relative position, or structure.
comtumacious
Stubbornly or willfully disobedient to authority.
epicene
Androgynous, or indeterminate sex.
magniloquence
High flown, bombastic language.
apothegmatic
Aphoristic.
frangible
Fragile, brittle.
deictic
Only understood in context.
nimbus
Luminous cloud or rainbow.
declension
Congugation.
epigoni
Imitators.
demotic
Vernacular, colloquial.
hypostasize
Treat or represent as concrete reality.
lapidary
Engraved or suitable for engraving on stone.
feint
Deceptive blow, thrust, maneuver.
imbricate
Arrange so as to overlap, like roof tiles.
chiliastic
Millenarian; once a millenium.
aspersions
An attack on the reputation or integrity of someone.
labile
Liable to change, easily altered.
scabrous
(1) Rough, covered with scabs.

(2) Indecent, salacious.
polysemous
Coexistence of many possible meanings for a word or phrase.
anomie
Lack of usual social or ethical standards in an individual or group.
imprimatur
Official license by Catholic Church to print religious book; guarantee or worth.
abrogate
Repeal or do away with.
epithalamium
A song or poem celebrating a marriage.
proleptic
(1) Anticipation and answering of argument in speech.

(2) Representing something before it happens.
layette
Set of clothing, linens for newborn child.
parturition
Action of giving birth to young.
manumit
Release from slavery, set free.
rictus
A fixed grimace or grin.
surd
1 Mathematics (of a number) irrational. 2 Phonetics (of a speech sound) uttered with the breath and not the voice (e.g., f, k, p, s, t).

noun 1 Mathematics a surd number, esp. the irrational root of an integer. 2 Phonetics a surd consonant.
motile
1 Zoology & Botany (of cells, gametes, and single-celled organisms) capable of motion. 2 Psychology of, relating to, or characterized by responses that involve muscular rather than audiovisual sensations.
scop
A scop (pronounced /ʃɒp/) was an Old English poet, the Anglo-Saxon counterpart of the Old Norse skald.

There were differences. As far as we can tell from what has been preserved, the art of the scop was directed mostly towards epic poetry; the surviving verse in Old English consists of the epic Beowulf, religious verse in epic formats such as the Dream of the Rood, heroic lays of battle, and stern meditations on mortality and the transience of earthly glory. By contrast, the verse preserved from the skalds consists mostly of poems in praise of kings and incidental verse preserved in the sagas, often done up in the elaborate dróttkvætt meter, and the ballad-like forms that form most of the corpus of the Poetic Edda. (See also: skaldic poetry) Both, of course, wrote within the Germanic tradition of alliterative verse. The scop was a performer as well as a poet; he recited or sang his verses, usually accompanying himself on a harp or a similar stringed instrument.
palimpset
a manuscript or piece of writing material on which the original writing has been effaced to make room for later writing but of which traces remain. • figurative something reused or altered but still bearing visible traces of its earlier form : Sutton Place is a palimpsest of the taste of successive owners.
gestalt
an organized whole that is perceived as more than the sum of its parts.
flagitious
1. Disgracefully or shamefully criminal; grossly wicked; scandalous; -- said of acts, crimes, etc.
2. Guilty of enormous crimes; corrupt; profligate; -- said of persons.