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17 Cards in this Set

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What are the three primary vesicles called?
forebrain
midbrain
hindbrain
What are the two secondary vesicles of the forebrain?
telencephalon and diencephalon
What are the three major components of the diencephalon?
Thalamus
Hypothalamus
Epithalamus
What is the primary structure in the midbrain?
Mesencephalon
What are the three primary structures in the hindbrain? One has an alternate name- what is it?
Pons
Cerebellum
Myelencephalon (medulla oblongata)
What two structures are contained within the metencephalon?
Pons and cerebellum
What are the three major categories of neurotransmitters? A__, A__, N__
Amines
Amino acids
Neuropeptides
Give four neurotransmitters in the amine category.
Acetylcholine
Dopamine
Norepinephrine
Serotonine
Give three neurotransmitters that are amino acids.
Glutamate
GABA
Glycine
Give at least three neurotranmitters that are neuropeptides.
Angiotensin II
Substance P
Somatostatin
Where are two major locations of neurons that emit norepinephrine.

List the corresponding locations for the terminals of each neuron.
Sympathetic ganglia => smooth and cardiac muscle, glands.

Locus ceruleus, reticular formation => widespread CNS areas
What are the four major locations of neurons that use dopamine? Where are their corresponding terminals?
Substantia nigra (compact part) => caudate nucleus, putamen.

Ventral tegmental area => limbic structures, cerebral cortex

Hypothalamus => infundibulum

Retina (some acrine cells) => local connections
What is the primay location of neurons that use serotonin? Where are the terminals?
Raphe nuclei => widespred CNS areaa
What is the mechanism involved with Lambert-Eaton myasthenic syndrome and what is affected?
Antibodies are produced which block the entry of Ca++ ions into the motor terminals which in turn prevents the trigger of acetylcholine release.

Patient is weak.
What does botullinum or tetus toxin do to neurotransmission?
Results in hydrolysis of one or more of the proteins required for vesicle attachment and fusion => prevents acetylcholine release.
What is myasthenia gravis?
A disease in which antibodies block the postsynaptic nicotinic receptors thus leading to muscle weakness.
What is the action of curare?
Blocks post synaptic nicotinic receptors which results in paralysis of muscles.