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47 Cards in this Set

  • Front
  • Back
Spiritual autobiography
Sin, conversion experience, ministry
Orientalism
stereotyped ideas of the East: alternative modernities, static irrational, effeminate and macho, superstitious "fabulated or constmeted East
Sublime
Origin of the sublime and beautiful by Edmund Burke 1757
Shaftesbury
awe of power outside of self
Sensibility
Fills mind with great ideas and soul delights in experience-terror
Gothic novel
Castle of Otranto
Robert Walpole
"1717 - 1797
Letter writer
protestant england
father was prime minister in 1742, culloden"
The Countess
Like Arabella - out of where she is able to speak her lang bc reads wmaned too more interested in separating now and then, many of princeses
Ridotto
Can't reveal truth, Lord orville master of mis. Evelina has to learn what society expects of her./manipulates truth, be civilized./having tolie
Miss Nobody
tension bt somebody and nobody. Fact and fiction, history and sim of history FQ addresses
Theodore
Heir of Alfonso
French and Indian War
"Seven year's war 1757-1763
england is starting to change from trade power over India but impvialist over it
England's relationship to the world, to be east"
Realist fiction
"particular places, events people
grounded in experience
trust senses
psychological realism - we believe what happens
progressive and linear narrative"
Romance
"can be circular
compression of present and past
anmhilated time
people - larger than life
accident, concidence, supernatural"
Lady Macclesfield
In 1698 Charles Gerard, 2nd Earl of Macclesfield , obtained a divorce from his wife, Anna, daughter of Sir Richard Mason, who shortly afterwards married Colonel Henry Brett. Lady Macclesfield had two children by Richard Savage, 4th Earl Rivers, the second of whom was born at Fox Court, Holborn, on January 16, 1697, and christened two days later at St Andrews, Holborn, as Richard Smith. Six months later the child was placed with Anne Portlock in Covent Garden ; nothing more is positively known of him.
Periodic Sentence
A Periodic Sentence (also called a Period) is a sentence that is not grammatically complete until its end. Periodicity is accomplished by the use of parallel phrases or clauses at the opening or by the use of dependent clauses preceding the independent clause; that is, the kernel of thought contained in the subject/ verb group appears at the end of a succession of modifiers. It is the opposite of a nuclear sentence. The periodic sentence is effective when it is used to arouse interest and curiosity, to hold an idea in suspense before its final revelation.
panegyric
A panegyric is a formal public speech, or (in later use) written verse, delivered in high praise of a person or thing, a generally highly studied and discriminating eulogy, not expected to be critical. It is derived from Greek meaning a speech "fit for a general assembly" (panegyris ). In Athens such speeches were delivered at national festivals or games, with the object of rousing the citizens to emulate the glorious deeds of their ancestors.
Retjenu
Retjenu, later rendered Retenu, was an Ancient Egyptian name for Canaan and Syria
epistolary novel
An epistolary novel or Briefroman is a novel written as a series of documents. The usual form is letters, although diary entries, newspaper clippings and other documents are sometimes used. The word epistolary comes from the word epistle, meaning a letter.
Lady Macclesfield
In 1698 Charles Gerard, 2nd Earl of Macclesfield , obtained a divorce from his wife, Anna, daughter of Sir Richard Mason, who shortly afterwards married Colonel Henry Brett. Lady Macclesfield had two children by Richard Savage, 4th Earl Rivers, the second of whom was born at Fox Court, Holborn, on January 16, 1697, and christened two days later at St Andrews, Holborn, as Richard Smith. Six months later the child was placed with Anne Portlock in Covent Garden ; nothing more is positively known of him.
Periodic Sentence
A Periodic Sentence (also called a Period) is a sentence that is not grammatically complete until its end. Periodicity is accomplished by the use of parallel phrases or clauses at the opening or by the use of dependent clauses preceding the independent clause; that is, the kernel of thought contained in the subject/ verb group appears at the end of a succession of modifiers. It is the opposite of a nuclear sentence. The periodic sentence is effective when it is used to arouse interest and curiosity, to hold an idea in suspense before its final revelation.
panegyric
A panegyric is a formal public speech, or (in later use) written verse, delivered in high praise of a person or thing, a generally highly studied and discriminating eulogy, not expected to be critical. It is derived from Greek meaning a speech "fit for a general assembly" (panegyris ). In Athens such speeches were delivered at national festivals or games, with the object of rousing the citizens to emulate the glorious deeds of their ancestors.
Retjenu
Retjenu, later rendered Retenu, was an Ancient Egyptian name for Canaan and Syria
epistolary novel
An epistolary novel or Briefroman is a novel written as a series of documents. The usual form is letters, although diary entries, newspaper clippings and other documents are sometimes used. The word epistolary comes from the word epistle, meaning a letter.
Love for Love
– (1695) a play by William Congreve that Evelina watches in London her Letter 20. The story is about a young Miss Prue who comes to live with her cousins in 18th Century London. It falls on the dashing Mr. Tattle to teach her how the game of love is played. She becomes an eager, and successful, pupil, just like the story of Evelina and Lord Orville.
Double Consciousness
- - W.E.B. Du Bois – idea of double consciousness
- the sense of always looking at one’s self through the eyes of somebody else
-not grounded in yourself, but imagining how you appear in other people’s eyes bc those people are more powerful than you
-measure one’s soul according to a world of contempt and pity
- create your own self concept

The concept of Du Boisian "double consciousness" has three manifestations. First, the power of white stereotypes on black life and thought. Second, the racism that excluded black Americans from the mainstream of society, being both American and not American. Finally, and most significantly, the internal conflict between being African and American simultaneously.

Double consciousness is an awareness of one's self as well as an awareness of how others perceive that person. The danger of double consciousness resides in conforming and or changing one's identity to that of how others perceive the person.
Sensibility
– Shaftesbury idea, moral sense, showing of man’s ability to feel, lead him to have fear, sentimentality
Shaftesbury
essentially born good, not into sin or fall
believed strongly in benevolence
suggesting that we all have sympathy for people, can do in public and private
Lady Louisa
– Orville’s sister
p. 280 blood, doesn’t tell whole story
Doesn’t behave like a woman of her relations.
Louisa and Lord Merton’s marriage not ideal

pretty piece of languor, no mind at all.
Lord Merton
– he and his friends Mr. Jack Coverley and Mr. Lovel meet Evelina in Bristol. They like car races and gambling, and frighten the women with them, but are frightened themselves when they have to quote classics (Horace). Evelina is especially disgusted by his “liberty”, i.e. attempts to have her as a lover although his future wife is in the same house. His limited abilities are satirised by Mrs. Selwyn: “a senator of the nation! A member of the noblest parliament in the world!-and yet neglect the art of oratory?” (III, xvi)
The Doctor in the “Female Quixote”
1752
- the doctor convinces her to understand the value of romance as a rational man would, and, therefore, affirm, as “‘normal and legitimate,’” the misogynistic structure of the patriarchal society. Arabella eventually becomes cured by a doctor who uses logic to reason her out of her madness, enforcing a principle of the Enlightenment that logic and reason triumph.
Dame Green
- Mrs. Clinton realizes Evelina’s nurse, Dame Green, must have exchanged her own child with Evelina right after her birth. Dame Green confesses the scheme, and Sir John acknowledges Evelina as daughter and heiress; he settles that his former daughter, now Miss Polly Green, shall marry Mr. Macartney (now that they are not siblings any more), and Evelina (publicly daughter of Sir John Belmont) Lord Orville.
subscription
– in 18th cent, we now have a publishing marketplace, market decides – ask ppl for money and put name in book
patronage
– old form, wealthy individuals funded poets
problem with this, you have to suck up to people, become sycophant, reason Johnson empathizes with Savage
Jurgen Habermas
– the structural transformation of the public sphere
Conduct book
– has to learn how to behave as a middle-class woman, Evelina
Oriental novel
- doesn’t’ inspire the same kind of terror as Englishman, Castle of Otranto
Gothic novel/fiction
- Gothic fiction began in England with The Castle of Otranto (1764) by Horace Walpole. It depended for its effect on the pleasing terror it induced in the reader, a new extension of literary pleasures that was essentially Romantic.
Prominent features of gothic fiction include terror (both psychological and physical), mystery, the supernatural, ghosts, haunted houses and Gothic architecture, castles, darkness, death, decay, doubles, madness, secrets and hereditary curses.
dealt with such emotional extremes and very dark themes, and because it found its most natural settings in the buildings of this style - castles, mansions, and monasteries, often remote, crumbling, and ruined.
neoclassical
- 1660-1798, generally called Neoclassical.
For the writers at hand, a response to social change was to emphasize and appropriate the values of classical philosophy and art, hence the term neoclassical. Classical literary theory taught writers to develop their facility in the classical genres. Horace satirized Rome and Dryden and Swift satirize contemporary Britain. Classical literature taught the rules of elegant, direct and meaningful writing; and these rules were adopted and championed, as in Pope’s Essay on Criticism.
Talking Book
- Equiano's account of the talking book is a commonly described experience in early slave works.
-part of the spiritual/freedom autobiography
in the second part, spiritual freedom – the Bible is a sort of talking book and speaks to him. Freedom through literacy, tremendous reality/
Black Atlantic
Paul Gilroy
-black diaspora – generally of African-Americans result of Atlantic trade
-newest term – for Africans all around the world:
“black globality” – not just confined to one traffic across an ocean
-mobility, immigration and migration
courtesy book
guides to the behavior of gentlemen
The life of Johnson
1784
The Castle of Otranto
1764
The History of Nourjahad
1767
Evelina
1778
The Interesting Narrative and Other Writings
1789