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57 Cards in this Set

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annelid
An invertebrate; a segmented worm (e.g., oligochaete, leech, or polychaete).
arthropod
Invertebrate with hard exoskeleton, specialized segments, and jointed appendages.
bilateral symmetry
Body plan with axis from anterior to posterior end, separated into right and left sides, and dorsal and ventral surface.
cephalization
Over time, the concentration of sensory structures and nerve cells in a head.
cnidarian
Type of radial invertebrate at the tissue level of organization; the only nematocyst producer.
coelom
A peritoneum-lined cavity between the gut and body wall of most animals.
collar cell
In sponge body wall, a flagellated cell
cuticle
Of annelids, a thin, flexible coat. Of arthropods, a lightweight exoskeleton hardened with protein and chitin.
deuterostome
Bilateral animal in which the anus forms from first indentation in the embryo (e.g., echinoderms, chordates).
echinoderm
Type of invertebrate with calcified spines, needles, or plates on body wall. Radial with some bilateral features (e.g., sea stars).
ectoderm
The first-formed, outermost primary tissue layer of animal embryos; gives rise to nervous system tissues and integument's outer layer
endoderm
Inner primary tissue layer of animal embryos; source of inner gut lining and derived organs.
exoskeleton
External skeleton (e.g., hardened cuticle of arthropods).
flatworm
One of the simplest invertebrates having organ systems; a turbellarian, fluke, or tapeworm. Some are notorious parasites.
gut
Generally, a sac or tube from which food is absorbed into internal environment. Also, gastrointestinal tract from stomach onward.
hermaphrodite
Individual having both male and female gonads.
invertebrate
Any animal without a backbone.
larva
Immature stage between an embryo and adult in many animal life cycles.
medusa
Of cnidarian life cycles, a freeswimming, bell-shaped stage, often with oral lobes and tentacles extending below the bell.
metamorphosis
Major changes in body form of certain animals; hormonally controlled growth, tissue reorganization, and remodeling of body parts leads to adult form.
mollusk
Only invertebrate with mantle draped over a soft, fleshy body; most have an external or internal shell. Diverse body plans and sizes (e.g., gastropods, bivalves, and cephalopods).
molting
Periodic shedding of worn-out or too small body structures. Permits some animals to grow in size or renew parts.
nematocyst
Cnidarian capsule that has a dischargeable, tube-shaped thread, sometimes barbed; releases a toxin or sticky substance.
protostome
Lineage of coelomate, bilateral animals that includes mollusks, annelids, and arthropods. The first indentation to form in protostome embryos becomes the mouth.
radial symmetry
Animal body plan having four or more roughly equivalent parts around a central axis (e.g., sea anemone).
roundworm
Cylindrical, bilateral, cephalized animal with a false coelom and a complete digestive system. Most cycle nutrients in communities; many are parasites.
sponge
Animal with no body symmetry, and no tissues, and phagocytic collar cells in its body wall. Lineage dates from precambrian.
vertebrate
Animal having a backbone.
water-vascular system
Of sea stars and sea urchins, a system of many tube feet that are deployed in synchrony for smooth locomotion.
hermaphrodite
Individual having both male and female gonads.
invertebrate
Any animal without a backbone.
larva
Immature stage between an embryo and adult in many animal life cycles.
medusa
Of cnidarian life cycles, a freeswimming, bell-shaped stage, often with oral lobes and tentacles extending below the bell.
metamorphosis
Major changes in body form of certain animals; hormonally controlled growth, tissue reorganization, and remodeling of body parts leads to adult form.
mollusk
Only invertebrate with mantle draped over a soft, fleshy body; most have an external or internal shell. Diverse body plans and sizes (e.g., gastropods, bivalves, and cephalopods).
molting
Periodic shedding of worn-out or too small body structures. Permits some animals to grow in size or renew parts.
nematocyst
Cnidarian capsule that has a dischargeable, tube-shaped thread, sometimes barbed; releases a toxin or sticky substance.
protostome
Lineage of coelomate, bilateral animals that includes mollusks, annelids, and arthropods. The first indentation to form in protostome embryos becomes the mouth.
radial symmetry
Animal body plan having four or more roughly equivalent parts around a central axis (e.g., sea anemone).
roundworm
Cylindrical, bilateral, cephalized animal with a false coelom and a complete digestive system. Most cycle nutrients in communities; many are parasites.
sponge
Animal with no body symmetry, and no tissues, and phagocytic collar cells in its body wall. Lineage dates from precambrian.
vertebrate
Animal having a backbone.
water-vascular system
Of sea stars and sea urchins, a system of many tube feet that are deployed in synchrony for smooth locomotion.
hermaphrodite
Individual having both male and female gonads.
invertebrate
Any animal without a backbone.
larva
Immature stage between an embryo and adult in many animal life cycles.
medusa
Of cnidarian life cycles, a freeswimming, bell-shaped stage, often with oral lobes and tentacles extending below the bell.
metamorphosis
Major changes in body form of certain animals; hormonally controlled growth, tissue reorganization, and remodeling of body parts leads to adult form.
mollusk
Only invertebrate with mantle draped over a soft, fleshy body; most have an external or internal shell. Diverse body plans and sizes (e.g., gastropods, bivalves, and cephalopods).
molting
Periodic shedding of worn-out or too small body structures. Permits some animals to grow in size or renew parts.
nematocyst
Cnidarian capsule that has a dischargeable, tube-shaped thread, sometimes barbed; releases a toxin or sticky substance.
protostome
Lineage of coelomate, bilateral animals that includes mollusks, annelids, and arthropods. The first indentation to form in protostome embryos becomes the mouth.
radial symmetry
Animal body plan having four or more roughly equivalent parts around a central axis (e.g., sea anemone).
roundworm
Cylindrical, bilateral, cephalized animal with a false coelom and a complete digestive system. Most cycle nutrients in communities; many are parasites.
sponge
Animal with no body symmetry, and no tissues, and phagocytic collar cells in its body wall. Lineage dates from precambrian.
vertebrate
Animal having a backbone.
water-vascular system
Of sea stars and sea urchins, a system of many tube feet that are deployed in synchrony for smooth locomotion.