Study your flashcards anywhere!

Download the official Cram app for free >

  • Shuffle
    Toggle On
    Toggle Off
  • Alphabetize
    Toggle On
    Toggle Off
  • Front First
    Toggle On
    Toggle Off
  • Both Sides
    Toggle On
    Toggle Off
  • Read
    Toggle On
    Toggle Off
Reading...
Front

How to study your flashcards.

Right/Left arrow keys: Navigate between flashcards.right arrow keyleft arrow key

Up/Down arrow keys: Flip the card between the front and back.down keyup key

H key: Show hint (3rd side).h key

A key: Read text to speech.a key

image

Play button

image

Play button

image

Progress

1/11

Click to flip

11 Cards in this Set

  • Front
  • Back
Causes of habitat fragmentation
“Habitat fragmentation occurs when areas of continuous
habitat are reduced to a set of smaller remnants
isolated by a structurally dissimilar matrix”
Cox et al. 2003
Causes:
• Agricultural/pastoral development
• Forestry development
• Urban development
• Natural disasters
General consequences
for wildlife
• Reduction in overall available habitat
• Fragmentation of remaining habitat
-matrix usually offers resistance to spp. movement
* Degradation of remaining habitat (reduction in quality)- weed incursion, dumping of waste
* New threats form within matrix
* New habitats and resources created
Landscape-specific consequences
• Effects of fragmentation depends on the land use between patches
• Movement of wildlife between patches depends upon how hostile the intervening matrix is to them.
• Matrix resistance varies greatly between landscapes
Agricultural v urban landscares
Ag- larger, distance between patches is greater
Urban- more hostile, habitat edges are harder
Matrix threats different
ie) urban, traffic; ag, feral predators
General trends in wildlife survival
***** Survivors tend to be habitat and/or dietary generalists
i.e. adaptable critters
• Mammals particularly hard hit - habitat specialists, low pre-disturbance densities, stochastic reproductive output (fluctuates)
• Survivors have altered ecologies
as amt of home ranges decreases densities increase
Loosers
Losers –
extinct in Brisbane
- Potoroo
- Rock wallaby
- Bettong
- Spotted tailed quoll
- Tube-nosed bat
Fringe dwellers
Greater glider
Phascogale
Platypus
Macropods (kangaroos and
wallabies)
Black-striped wallaby
Grey kangaroo
Antechinus
Dunnart
Planigale
Dasyurids
Winners
Brushtail possum
Ringtail possum

Flying
foxes
Grey-headed FF
Black FF

Neighbors (survive in patches)-
Squirrel glider
Water rat
Swamp rat
Echidna
Koala
Swamp wallaby
Northern brown bandicoot
The northern brown bandicoot
• marsupial (8 teats)
• 1.5-3 kg
• ground-dwelling
• solitary & territorial
• habitat generalist
• opportunistic omnivore
(mostly eats grubs/tubers in soil)
• Enormous reproductive potential
The northern brown bandicoot: Distribution
•69 patches surveyed
•size range (<1ha to >360ha)
•80% small (<10ha)
•60% on a creekline
•habitat features recorded

Bandicoot distribution
33 of 69 patches
occupied (48%)
Functional connectivity
Incorporates the combined
effects of:
1. Landscape structure
2. The species ability to use
and move within the various
landscape elements
Therefore, any measure of
functional connectivity must
be both landscape-and
species-specific.
MOST IMPORTANT THING in having a good habitat