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33 Cards in this Set

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Beowulf manuscripts, author, etc.
originally told in Old English and written in 700 in Old English
Alliteration
the repetition of initial consonant sounds in accented syllables
Allusion
reference to something well known in history
Caesura
rhythmic breaks in the middle of lines, where the reciter could pause for a breath
Kennings
two-word poetic renaming of people, places, and things, such as the kenning whales home for the sea
Similies
compares two apparently dissimilar things
Meadhall
a king would build a hall where mead was served to reward his thanes
Thanes
early noblemen for England, would fight for the kings
Anglo-Saxons required by law to avenge death of a loved one
Scop
travelling storytellers who memorized, adapted, and passed along oral tradition of stores and songs
Foreshaddowing
to present an indication or a suggestion of beforehand
Didactic
intending to learn as wall as to entertain (type of work Beowulf is)
In medias res
start some where other the beginning
patriarchal society
society headed by men
elegy
a lyric poem mourning the loss of someone or something
Exeter Book
collection of manuscripts that includes pieces of oral tradition
homeric/heroic similie
extended, extended, extended similie
2,500 BC
cave dwellers first inhabitors
2,000 BC
invades from Iberian Peninsula; in Sweden they built Stonehenge
600 BC - 55 BC
Celtic tribes from Central Europe, moved north to N. France and N. Germany
Brytons
religion: animism (all of nature is alive with spiritis)
Celtics
priests were Druids
ex: Brytons, Argyles, Gaels
Druids
mistletoe was very fertile, should be protective
55 BC - 410 AD
Romans invade, conquer Brythons, push them west to hide in Cornwall
Romans
brought Christianity to the area
Brytons after Romans
language was mixed with Latin
450 AD - 1066 AD
Anglo-Saxons pushed the Celtic-Brytons west again, in constant war
fought for centuries, kept out of Wales, Cornwall–>Celts dwindle
Anglo-Saxons
language: Germanic tongue and Latin and few Celtic words
Late 500's
Columba gains converts to Chrsitianity
800's
Norse of Norway and Danes attack Ireland and England
Anglo-Saxon poetry
heroic poetry: recounting achievements of warriors