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65 Cards in this Set

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somnambulist
n. sleepwalker
somnolent
adj. half asleep


the heavy meal and the hot room made us all somnolent
sonorous
adj. resonant


sonorous voice
sophist
n. teacher of philosophy; quibbler; employer of fallacious reasoning



You are using all the devices of a sophist in trying to prove your case; your argument is still specious
sophistry
n. seemingly plausible but fallacious reasoning


Instead of advancing valid arguments he tried to overwhelm his audience w/ a flood of sophistries
sophomoric
adj. immature; half-baked, like a sophomore


your humor is sophomoric
soporific
adj. sleep-causing; marked by sleepiness


his lectures are so soporific
sordid
adj. filthy; base; vile



the social worker was angered by the sordid housing provided for the homeless
spangle
n. small metallic piece sewn to clothing for ornamentation


the thousands of spangles on her dress sparkled in the glare of the stage lights
spartan
adj. lacking luxury and comfort; sternly disciplined


living in such spartan quarters

only his spartan sense of duty kept him at his post
spat
n. squabble; minor dispute


what started as a mere spat escalated into a full-blown argument
spate
n. sudden flood



I am worried about he possibility of a spate if the rains do not diminish soon
spawn
v. lay eggs

the salmon return to spawn in their native streams
specious
adj. seemingly reasonable bu incorrect; misleading (often intentionally)
spectral
adj. ghostly


the spectral glow scared me
sphinx-like
adj. enigmatic; mysterious


Mona Lisa's sphinx-like expression
splice
v. fasten together; unite


splice the 2 strips of tape together
spoonerism
n. accidental transposition of sounds in successive words


Futt Bucker
sportive
adj. playful



sportive attitude
spruce
adj. neat and trim


he looked spruce for his job interview
spry
adj. vigorously active; nimble


She was 80 yrs old, yet still spry and alert!
spurious
adj. false; counterfeit; forged; illogical



how do you tell spurious antiques from the real thing?
spurn
v. reject; scorn


the heroine spurned the villain's advances
squabble
n. minor quarrel; bickering


kids always get involved in petty squabbles
squalor
n. filth; degradation; dirty, neglected state


the shack was the picture of squalor


adj. squalid
squander
v. waste


don't squander your allowance on candy!
squat
adj. stocky; short and thick



Tolkien's hobbits are somewhat squat, sturdy little creatures
staid
adj. sober; sedate


her conduct during the funeral was staid and solemn
stalwart
adj. strong, brawny; steadfast


His consistent support of the party has proved that he is a stalwart and loyal member
stanch
v. check flow of blood


u should stanch the gushing wound before you attend to other injuries
statute
n. law enacted by the legislature
statutory
adj. created by statute or legislative action



The judicial courts review and try statutory crimes
steadfast
adj. loyal; unswerving



she was steadfast in her affections
stealth
n. slyness; sneakiness; secretiveness


he inched his way towards the enemy camp w/ great stealth
steep
v. soak; saturate

steep the fabric in the dye bath
stellar
adj. pertaining to the stars



He was the stellar attraction of the entire performance
stem
v. check the flow

stem the bleeding from the slashed artery
stentorian
adj. extremely loud



he had a stentorian voice
stickler
n. perfectionist; person who insists things be exactly right

a stickler for accuracy
stifle
v. suppress; extinguish; inhibit



Halfway through the boring lecture, Laura gave up trying to stifle her yawns
stigma
n. token of disgrace; brand


I do not attach any stigma to the fact that you were accused of this crime
stilted
adj. bombastic; stiffly pompous



his stilted rhetoric did not impress the audience
stint
v. be thrifty; set limits

he refused to stint on wedding arrangements

n. supply; allotted amount; assigned portion of work



She performed her daily stint cheerfully and willingly
stipple
v. paint or draw w/ dots


he stippled dabs of color on the canvas
stipulate
v. make express conditions, specify

Before agreeing to reduce American forces, the Pres. stipulated that...
stock
adj. typical; standard; kept regularly in supply


the book portrays stock characters
stockade
n. wooden enclosure or pen; fixed line of posts used as defensive barrier


get the horses in the stockade before the Indians come!
stodgy
adj. stuffy; boringly conservative


for a young person, Winston is remarkably stodgy
stoke
v. stir up a fire; feed plentifully


I know how to stoke the fire if it begins to die down
stolid
adj. dull; impassive


The earthquake shattered Stuart's usual stolid demeanor
strategem
n. clever tick; deceptive scheme
stratum
n. layer of earth's surface; layer of society
strew
v. spread randomly; sprinkle; scatter


the flower girl will strew rose petals along the aisle
stricture
n. critical comments; severe and adverse criticism



His strictures on the author's style are unwarranted
strident
adj. loud and harsh; insistent



We can't hear the speaker over the strident cries of the hecklers
strut
n. supporting bar
studied
adj. unspontaneous; deliberate; thoughtful

She felt that the omission of his name from the guest list was a studied insult
stultify
v. cause to appear or become stupid or inconsistent; frustrate or hinder

menial labor had stultified his mind
stupefy
v. make numb; stun; amaze

these medications should stupefy her
stygian
adj. gloomy; hellish; deathly


stygian darkness
stymie
v. present an obstacle; stump

the detective was stymied by the contradictory evidence
subaltern
n. subordinate
subjugate
v. conquer; bring under control


it is not our aim to subjugate our foe
sublimate
v. regine; purify


We must strive to sublimate these desires and emotions into worthwhile activities
sublime
adj. exalted; noble and uplifting; utter


Lucy was in awe of Desi's sublime muscianship, while he was in awe of her sublime naivete.