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52 Cards in this Set

  • Front
  • Back
When it was suggested to ... ... that one of his works ... be bound in ..., ... ... ...--
Walt Whitman
should
velum
was outraged
''Pshaw!" he ..., "-- ..., curtains, finger ..., chinaware, ... ...!"
snorted
hangings
bowls
Mathew Arnold!
And ... ... ... ... equally ... by talk ... ...;
he might have been
irritated
of style;
for he boasted of "... ... ..."--
"barbaric yawp"
he ... ... be literay;
would not [ital]
his readers should not ... a ... ... ...
touch
book but a man.
Yet Witman ... ... ... rewrite ... ... four times,
and his style is ...
took pains to
Leaves of Grass
unmistakable.
... ... maintained that writers ... ... ... their style became ...
Samuel Butler
who bothered about
unreadable
but he ... ... ... ...
bothered about his own.
Style ... ... ... ... ... by ... associated with ... and ... personsm, who, like ... ...
name
growing
precious and superior
Oscar Wilde,
spend a morning ... ... ... ..., and ... ...( ... ... ...) ... ... ... again.
putting in a comma,
the afternoon
(so he said)
taking it out again.
But such ... of 'style' is ... of English.
abuse
misuse
For the word means ... " a way of ... ..., in language, ..., or ...';
merely
expressing oneself
manner,
appearance;
or, ..., ' a ... ... of expressing oneslef"-- ... when one says, "Her ... ... ... ..."
good (it)
way
behaviour never lacked style.
Now there is no ... in expressing oneslef (though to try to ... oneslef ... others easily grows ... or ...)
crime
impress
on
revolting
ridiculous
Indeed one cannot help expressing oneslef, unless one ... ...'s ... ... a ...
passses one's life in a cupboard.
Even the most Communist, or
...-... , is compelled by Nature to have a unique ..., unique ..., unique ...
rigid
Organization-man
voice
fingerprints
handwriting.
Even the signatures of the letters on your ... ... may reveal more than their
writers ... breaksfast table
guess.
Thhere are ... signatures that ... ... ... the page like ... b... ... a t...
blustering
swish across the page
cornstalks
bowed
before
a tempest
There are ... signatures, lik a ... of lightening across a ..., .
cryptic
scrabble
suggesting that behind is a ... ... whom none is worth to know (though, as this might be highly incovenient, a ... typist sometimes ... the mystery in a bracket...)
lofty divinity
docile
interprets
underneath
There are ... ... implying that the author is a sort of ... ... ... round the globe evey eighty minutes.
impetuous squiggles
strenuos Sputnik streaking
There are f... signatures, ... c... and d... and fl..., like the youthful ... (though these seem rather out of fsashion).
florid
all curlicues and danglements
Disraeli
There are h..., h... signatures
humble, humdrum
And there are also, sometimes, sigatures that are ... clear, yet ... ... a certain simple ... and artistic ...-- in short, ... ....
courteously
mindful of
grace
economy
of style.
Since, then, none of us can ... ... ... ..., or even open his mouth, withoug giveing something of ... ... to ... ...,
put pen to paper
himself away
shrewd observers
it seems ... common senese to give the matter a ... ...
mere
little thought.
Yet it does not seem
very ….
common.
Ladies may take ... pains ...
having style in their clothes, but many of us remain ... ... about having it in ... ...
infinite
about
curiously
indifferent
our words.
How many women would ... of ... not only their ... but also their ...?
dream
polishing
nails
tongues
They may ... freely on that ... ... ..., but they cannot often be ... to ... it.
play
perlious little organ,
bothered
tune
And how many men ... of ... their ... as well as their ... ...
think
improving
talk
golf handicap
... ... strong silent men, speaking only in … …, may despise “mere words.
No doubt
gruff monosyllables
” No doubt the world does suffer from an … … of verbal dysentery.But that,… , is bad style.
endemic plague
precisely
And … the amazing power of mere words.
consider
… …was a bad artist, bad statesman, bad general and bad man.
Adolf Hitler
But … because he could tune his rant, with psychological nicety, to the exact wave length of his audiences and make millions quarrelsome-drunk all at the same time by his command of windy nonsense, skilled statesmen, soldiers, scientists were blown away like chaff, and he came near to rule the world. If Sir Winston Churchill had been a mere speechifier, we might well have lost the war؛yet his speeches did quite a lot to win it.
largely
Adolf Hitler was a bad artist, bad statesman, bad general and bad man. But largely because he could … … … …, with psychological nicety, to the exact wave length of his audiences and make millions quarrelsome-drunk all at the same time by his command of windy nonsense, skilled statesmen, soldiers, scientists were blown away like chaff, and he came near to rule the world. If Sir Winston Churchill had been a mere speechifier, we might well have lost the war؛yet his speeches did quite a lot to win it.
tune his rant
Adolf Hitler was a bad artist, bad statesman, bad general and bad man. But largely because he could tune his rant, … … … , to the exact wave length of his audiences and make millions quarrelsome-drunk all at the same time by his command of windy nonsense, skilled statesmen, soldiers, scientists were blown away like chaff, and he came near to rule the world. If Sir Winston Churchill had been a mere speechifier, we might well have lost the war؛yet his speeches did quite a lot to win it.
with psychological nicety
No doubt strong silent men, speaking only in gruff monosyllables, may despise “mere words.” No doubt the world does suffer from an endemic plague of verbal dysentery. But that, precisely, is bad style. And consider the amazing power of mere words. Adolf Hitler was a bad artist, bad statesman, bad general and bad man. But largely because he could tune his rant, with psychological nicety, … … … … of his audiences and make millions quarrelsome-drunk all at the same time by his command of windy nonsense, skilled statesmen, soldiers, scientists were blown away like chaff, and he came near to rule the world. If Sir Winston Churchill had been a mere speechifier, we might well have lost the war؛yet his speeches did quite a lot to win it.
to the exact wave length of
But largely because he could tune his rant, with psychological nicety, to the exact wave length of his audiences and make millions ...-... all at the same time by his command of windy nonsense, skilled statesmen, soldiers, scientists were blown away like chaff, and he came near to rule the world. If Sir Winston Churchill had been a mere speechifier, we might well have lost the war؛yet his speeches did quite a lot to win it.
quarrelsome-drunk
But largely because he could tune his rant, with psychological nicety, to the exact wave length of his audiences and make millions quarrelsome-drunk all at the same time by ... ... … …. …, skilled statesmen, soldiers, scientists were blown away like chaff, and he came near to rule the world. If Sir Winston Churchill had been a mere speechifier, we might well have lost the war؛yet his speeches did quite a lot to win it.
his command of windy nonsense
skilled statesmen, soldiers, scientists were … … like … and he came near to rule the world. If Sir Winston Churchill had been a mere speechifier, we might well have lost the war؛yet his speeches did quite a lot to win it.
blown away
chaff
skilled statesmen, soldiers, scientists were blown away like chaff, and he … …to rule the world.
came near
No man was … … a literary aesthete than Benjamin Frnaklin.
less of
No man was less of a … …than Benjamin Frnaklin.
literary aesthete
No man was less of a literary aesthete than … ….
Benjamin Frnaklin
Yet this …-… t son, who changed world history, regarded as “a principal means of my advancement” that pungent style which he acquired partly by poring over old Spectators؛but mainlyby being Benjamin Frnaklin.
tallow-chandler’s.
Yet this tallow-chandler’s son, who changed world history, regarded as”… … … … … …” that pungent style which he acquired partly by poring over old Spectators؛but mainly by being Benjamin Frnaklin.
“a principal means of my advancement”
Yet this tallow-chandler’s son, who changed world history, regarded as” a principal means of my advancement” that … … which he acquired partly by poring over old Spectators؛but mainly by being Benjamin Frnaklin.
pungent style
that pungent style which he acquired partly by ... ... old Spectators؛but mainly by being Benjamin Frnaklin.
poring over
that pungent style which he acquired partly by old Spectators؛but mainly by being … …
Bejamin Frnaklin