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24 Cards in this Set

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angular diameter
The angle formed by lines extending from the observer to opposite sides of an object. (p. 21)
angular distance
The angle formed by lines extending from the observer to two locations. (p. 21)
apparent visual magnitude (mv)
The brightness of a star as seen by human eyes on Earth. (p. 16)
asterism
A named grouping of stars that is not one of the recognized constellations. Examples are the Big Dipper and the Pleiades. (p. 15)
celestial equator
The imaginary line around the sky directly above Earth's equator. (p. 20)
celestial pole (north or south)
One of the two points on the celestial sphere directly above Earth's poles. (p. 20)
celestial sphere
An imaginary sphere of very large radius surrounding Earth and to which the planets, stars, sun, and moon seem to be attached. (p. 20)
circumpolar constellation (north or south)
A constellation so close to one of the celestial poles that it never sets or never rises as seen from a particular latitude. (p. 21)
constellation
One of the stellar patterns identified by name, usually of mythological gods, people, animals, or objects. Also, the region of the sky containing that star pattern. (p. 14)
east point
One of the four cardinal directions. The point on the horizon directly east. (p. 20)
horizon
The circular boundary between the sky and Earth. (p. 20)
magnitude scale
The astronomical brightness scale. The larger the number, the fainter the star. (p. 15)
minute of arc
An angular measure. One sixtieth of a degree. (p. 21)
model
See scientific model.
nadir
The point on the celestial sphere directly below the observer. The opposite of the zenith. (p. 20)
north celestial pole
The point on the celestial sphere directly above Earth's North Pole. (p. 20)
north point
One of the four cardinal directions. The point on the horizon directly north. (p. 20)
precession
The slow change in the direction of Earth's axis of rotation. One cycle takes nearly 26,000 years. (p. 18)
scientific model
A tentative description of a phenomenon for use as an aid to understanding. (p. 18)
second of arc
An angular measure. One sixtieth of a minute of arc. (p. 21)
south celestial pole
The point on the celestial sphere directly above Earth's South Pole. (p. 20)
south point
One of the four cardinal directions. The point on the horizon directly south. (p. 20)
west point
One of the four cardinal directions. The point on the horizon directly west. (p. 20)
zenith
The point on the sky directly above the observer. (p. 20)