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49 Cards in this Set

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  • Back
How often are elections?
every two years
Representatives- every 2 years
President- every 4 years
Senators- every 6 years
Why do incumbent congresspersons enjoy an advantage in reelection campaigns?
for rep.s, district is small and often one main party, but senators have more of a challenge; 90% rep.s reelected
What are the two phases of the election cycle?
1. nominations- parties choose thier candidates
2. general elections- voters decide who will hold office
What is a closed primary?
voting is restricted to registered members of the party holding the primary
What is an open primary?
voters may vote only in one party's primary, but they may vote in whichever party primary they choose
What are some disadvantages of an open primary?
voters may sabotage thier opponents' primaries by crossing party lines to vote for the least likely candidate
What is a blanket primary?
they use the same procedure as general elections -voters may vote for whoever they want; only in WA and AL
Plurality
the candidate who receives the most votes in a primary election is declared the winner
What is a runoff primary?
if no candidate gets a plurality, then the two people with the most votes hold another election
What goes on at state caucuses and conventions?
local parties select delegates who then go on to vote for party presidential candidates
How often are elections?
every two years
Representatives- every 2 years
President- every 4 years
Senators- every 6 years
Why do incumbent congresspersons enjoy an advantage in reelection campaigns?
for rep.s, district is small and often one main party, but senators have more of a challenge; 90% rep.s reelected
What are the two phases of the election cycle?
1. nominations- parties choose thier candidates
2. general elections- voters decide who will hold office
What is a closed primary?
voting is restricted to registered members of the party holding the primary
What is an open primary?
voters may vote only in one party's primary, but they may vote in whichever party primary they choose
What are some disadvantages of an open primary?
voters may sabotage thier opponents' primaries by crossing party lines to vote for the least likely candidate
What is a blanket primary?
they use the same procedure as general elections -voters may vote for whoever they want; only in WA and AL
Plurality
the candidate who receives the most votes in a primary election is declared the winner
What is a runoff primary?
if no candidate gets a plurality, then the two people with the most votes hold another election
What goes on at state caucuses and conventions?
local parties select delegates who then go on to vote for party presidential candidates
When does presidential primary season start?
January 1st of election year, with debates, speechs, media events. earliest primaries can help boost a candidate
What is Super Tuesday?
the day in early March when many Southern states hold thier primaries together
What is front-loading?
Front-loading is when larger states move forward thier primaries so as to have a bigger influence on who wins
What are brokered conventions?
a convention that chooses who the party nominee is since none has received a majority of the delegates' votes
What is one of the main purposes of a national party convention
unify the party since primaries can damage the party with candidates attacking each other
What else goes on at national party conventions?
they are televised to try to convince people to vote for the party; they're the site for negotiations and drama
What impact can the national party conventions have on general election results?
The impact is usually negative- fighting outside a 1968 Democratic convention made a bad impression
What is a post-convention bump?
the rise in public approval after national party conventions
What is the electoral college?
each state is given electors equal to # of Congresspeople that cast thier votes based on winner-take-all
What is the winner-take-all system?
the winner of the presidential election in a state wins all of that states' electoral votes
When does presidential primary season start?
January 1st of election year, with debates, speechs, media events. earliest primaries can help boost a candidate
What is Super Tuesday?
the day in early March when many Southern states hold thier primaries together
What is front-loading?
Front-loading is when larger states move forward thier primaries so as to have a bigger influence on who wins
What are brokered conventions?
a convention that chooses who the party nominee is since none has received a majority of the delegates' votes
What is one of the main purposes of a national party convention
unify the party since primaries can damage the party with candidates attacking each other
What else goes on at national party conventions?
they are televised to try to convince people to vote for the party; they're the site for negotiations and drama
What impact can the national party conventions have on general election results?
The impact is usually negative- fighting outside a 1968 Democratic convention made a bad impression
What is a post-convention bump?
the rise in public approval after national party conventions
What is the electoral college?
each state is given electors equal to # of Congresspeople that cast thier votes based on winner-take-all
What is the winner-take-all system?
the winner of the presidential election in a state wins all of that states' electoral votes
Does the media place too much emphasis on irrelevant issues in presidential campaigns?
The media focus on the candidates' stanidng in the polls, not about thier positions on issues.
Why do incumbents win at such high rates?
90% of incumbents are reelected because they have the $$$ and name recognition to do so
Why is voter turnout so low in the United States?
a lot of Americans seem to feel that the election is clear as to who is going to win, so they don't vote
What is the impact of primary elections, and who votes in them?
Primaries determine who can go on to be a candidate in the general election; often only registered members vote
Why do political parties have such a difficult holding thier coalitions together?
some coalitions believe extreme things that takes negotiations in the whole party to agree upon
Why are soft money contributions considered a threat to the election process?
Soft money contributions are a threat because it allows some candidates a huge advantage over others
Why did the Supreme Court have a problem with the imposition of spending limits on PACs?
the SC ruled that mandatory spending limits on campaigns violates the 1st Amendment rights to free expression
Has the Federal Election Campaign Reform Act succeeded in fulfilling the intent of the legislation?
campaign finance reform is a difficult issue because it would limit some incumbents' chance of reelection
What accounts for the so-called gender gap?
society seems to be uncomfortable with women in leadership positions