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51 Cards in this Set

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  • Back
surgical removal of an infected pharyngeal tonsil
ADENOIDECTOMY
a dangerous lung condition that can develop after sever injury to the body. Following the trauma, neutrophils leave the body's capillaries in large numbers and then secrete chemicals that increase capillary permeability. The capillary-rich lungs are heavily affected. As the lungs fill with the fluids of edema, the patient suffocates.
ADULT RESPIRATORY DISTRESS SYNDROME (ARDS)
the act of inhaling or drawing something into the lungs or respiratory passages.
ASPIRATION
use of a viewing tube inserted through the nose or mouth to examine the internal surface of the main bronchi in the lung.
BRONCHOSCOPY
abnormal breathing pattern sometimes seen just before death and in people with combined neurological and cardiac disorders.
CHEYNE-STOKES BREATHING
condition in which the nasal septum takes a more lateral course than usual and may obstruct breathing
DEVIATED SEPTUM
a thin plastic tube threaded into the trachea through the nose or mouth; used to deliver oxygen to patients who are breathing inadequately, in a coma, or under anesthesia
ENDOTRACHEAL TUBE
nosebleed; commonly follows trauma to the nose or excessive nose blowing
EPISTAXIS
mushroomlike benign neoplasms of the nasal mucosa; may occur in response to nasal irritation and may block airflow
NASAL POLYPS
inability to breathe in the horizontal position
ORTHOPNEA
branch of medicine that deals with diagnosis and treatment of diseases of the ears, nose, and throat
OTORHINOLARYNGOLOGY
infectious inflammation of the lungs, in which fluid accumulates in the alveoli
PNEUMONIA
obstruction of the pulmonary artery or one of its branches by an embolus(most often a blood clot that has been carried from the lower limbs and through the right side of the heart into the pulmonary circulation).
PULMONARY EMBOLISM
condition in which the vocal cords of the larynx are out of control and the first syllable of words is repeated in "machine-gun" fashion
stuttering
unexpected death of an apparently healthy infant during sleep. most cases occur in infants placed in a prone position (on their abdomen) to sleep--a position which results in hypoxia due to rebreathing exhaled (CO2-rich) air.
SUDDEN INFANT DEATH SYNDROME (SIDS)
surgical opening of the trachea
TRACHEOTOMY
500 ml in both sexes; amt. of air inhaled or exhaled at rest
TIDAL VOLUME
3100 in males, 1900 in females; amount of air that can be forcefully inhaled after normal tidal inhalation
INSPIRATORY RESERVE VOLUME
1200 ml in males, 700 in females; amount of air that can be forcefully exhaled after normal tidal exhalation
EXPIRATORY RESERVE VOLUME
1200 ml in males, 1100 in females; amount of air remaining in lungs after forced exhalation
RESIDUAL VOLUME
6000 in males, 4200 in females; maximum amt. of air in lungs after maximum inspiratory effort; =tidal vol.+inspiratory reserve volume+ expiratory reserve vol.+ residual vol.
TOTAL LUNG CAPAPCITY
4800 in males, 3100 in females; maximum amt. of air that can be expired after maximum inspiratory effort; = tidal vol.+ inspiratory reserve vol.+ expiratory reserve vol.
VITAL CAPACITY
3600 in males, 2400 in females; maximum amt. of air that can be inspired after normal expiration; =tidal volume+ inspiratory reserve vol.
INSPIRATORY CAPACITY
2400 in males, 1800 in females; vol. of air in lungs after a normal tidal-vol. expiration; =expiratory reserve vol.+ residual vol.
FUNCTIONAL RESIDUAL CAPACITY
common respiratory disorder of neonates, especially premature babies
INFANT RESPIRATORY DISTRESS SYNDROME
incompolete formation of palate
CLEFT PALATE
genetic disorder that produces persistent infection. causes over secretion of mucus that clogs repiratory passages
CYSTIC FIBROSIS
when air enters plueral cavity surrounding either lung and causes lung to collapse
PNEUMONTHORAX
caused by rapid travel from los to very high elevation
ACUTE MOUNTAIN SICKNESS
response to long-term change from low to high elevation
ACCLIMATIZATION
depth and rate of breathing are increased, enhances alveolar ventilation, flushes carbon dioxide out of blood, increases pH of blood and heart, person may become dizzy or faint
HYPERVENTILATION
low level of carbon dioxide in blood; breathing into paper bag would increase level of carbon dioxide
HYPOCAPNIA
breathing is slow and shallow
HYPOVENTILATION
cessation of breathing may occur until carbon dioxide again stimulates repiration (someone exposed to pure oxygen)
APNEA
inflammation of nasal mucosa
RHINITIS
inflammation of sinuses
SINUSITIS
most widely spread of all respiratory diseases; no cure is available; probably many different kinds of viruses
COMMON COLD
viral disease that causes inflammation of upper repiratory tract
INFLUENZA
inflammation of tonsils
TONSILLITIS
inflammation of larynx; produces hoarse voice and limits ability to talk
LARYNGITIS
inadequate delivery of oxygen to body tissues
HYPOXIA
coal miners and welders are more apt to have inhalation of soote. buildup of particles in alveoli that makes the alveoli give off CO2 instead of O2.
BLACK LUNG DISEASE
when sand or dust is breathed into the respiroratory system, the sharp particles end up in alveoli. the accumulation could result in a shortage of O2 being given off and heart failure. or the sharp particles could rub up against the alveoli and cut it which lets blood in. this overwhelms the system and results in heart failure.
SILICOSIS
a type of hypoxia; leading cause of death from fire
CARBON MONOXIDE POISONING
inflammation of pleurae
PLEURISY
e.g., chronic bronchitis and obstructive emphysema; patients usually have smoking history; dyspnea; coughing and pulmonary infections are common
CHRONIC OBSTRUCTIVE PULMONARY DIESEASE
affects persons who are allergic to dust mistes, cockroaches, cats, dogs, fungi; causes respiratory swelling and blocking of lower repiratory tubes
ASTHMA
caused by a bacteria; about 1/3 of human pipulation is infected; symptom is coughing up blood
TUBERCULOSIS
inhaled irritants lead to chronic excesive production of mucus
CHRONIC BRONCHITIS
caused by breakdown of alveoli; common of smokers
OBSTRUCTIVE EMPHYSEMA
caused by repeated inhalatin of irritating substances such as cigarette smoke
LUNG CANCER