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10 Cards in this Set

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Satire
A work that reveals a critical attitude toward some element of human behavior by portraying it in an extreme way. Satire doesn't simply abuse (as in Invective) or get personal (as in sarcasm). Satire targets groups or large concepts rather than individuals.
Setting
Time and place of a literary work.
Simile
A figure of speech that uses like, as, or as if to make a direct comparison between two essentially different objects, actions, or qualities; for example, "The sky looked like an artist's canvas."
Speaker
The voice of a work; an author may speak as himself or herself or as a fictitious persona
Stereotype
A character who represents a trait that is usually attributed to a particular social or racial group and who lacks individuality; a conventional patter, expression or idea.
Straw Man
WHen a writer argues against a claim that nobody actually holds or is universally considered weak. Setting up a straw man diverts attention from the real issues.
Style
An author's characteristic manner of expression - his or her diction, syntax, imagery, structure. and content all contribute to style.
Subjectivity
A personal presentation of evens and characters, influenced by the author's feelings and opinions.
Syllogism
A form of reasoning in which two statements are made and a conclusion is drawn from them. A syllogism is the format of a formal argument that consists of a major premise, a minor premise, and a conclusion.
Symbolism
the use of symbols or anything that is meant to be taken both literally and as representative of a higher and more complex significance