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15 Cards in this Set

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AD HOMINEM ARGUMENT
An argument that appeals to emotion rather than reason, to feeling rather than intellect
ALLEGORY
The device of using character and/or story elements symbolically to represent an abstraction in addition to the literal meaning
Example: In come allegories, the author may intend to personify an abstraction like hope or freedom. The allegorical meaning usually deals with moral truth or a generalization about human existence
ALLITERATION
The repetition of sounds espescially initial consonant sunds in two or more neighboring words. The repetition can reinforce meaning, unify ideas, and/or supply musical sounds.
ALLUSION
A direct or indirect reference to something which is presumably commonly known, such as an event, book, myth, place, or work of art.
AMBIGUITY
The multiple meanings, either intentional or unintentional, of a word, phrase, sentence, or passage.
ANALOGY
A similarity or comparison between two different things or the relationship between them.
ANTECEDENT
The word, phrase, or clause referred to by a pronoun.
APHORISM
A terse statement of known authorship which expresses a general truth or moral principle. If authorship is unknown, it is considered to be a folk proverb.
An aporism can be a memorable summation of the authors point.
APOSTROPHE
A figure of speech that directly addresses an absent or imaginary person or personified abstraction, such as liberty or love. The effect may add familiarity or emotional intensity.
ATMOSPHERE
The emotional mood created by the entirety of a literary work, established partly by the setting and partly by the author's choice of objects described. Frequently, atmosphere foreshadows events.
CLAUSE
A grammatial unit that contains both a subject and a verb. An independent, or main, clause expresses a complete thought and can stand alone as a sentence. A dependant, or subordinate, clause cannot stand alone as a sentence and must br accompanied by an independent clause.
COLLOQUIAL/COLLOQUIALISM
The use of slang or informalities in speech or writing.
CONCEIT
A fanciful expression, usually in the form of ann extended metaphor or surprising analogy between seemingly dissimilar objects. A conceit displays intellectual cleverness due to unusual comparison being made.
CONNOTATION
The nonliteral, assosciative meaning of a word; the implied suggested meaning. Connotations may involve ideas, emotions, or attitudes.
DENOTATION
The strict, literal, dictionary definition of a word, devoid of any emotion, attitude or color.