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17 Cards in this Set

  • Front
  • Back
evocation (of place)
Creation anew through the power of the memory (a place)
ellipsis
...
some material has been omitted
exhortative
Acting or intended to encourage, incite, or advise.
ad hoc (argument)
For the specific purpose, case, or situation at hand and for no other
periodic sentence
presents its main clause at the end of the sentence for emphasis and sentence variety, preceded by phrases, dependent clauses
compound-complex sentence
A sentence with at least two independent clauses and one or more dependent clauses
exposition
background information about the characters, events, or setting is conveyed
denotation
literal or dictionary meaning of a word
ad hominem
in an argument, attack on the person rather on opponent's ideas
epigraph
a phrase, quotation, or poem that is set at the beginning of a document or component. may serve as a preface, as a summary, as a counter-example
deduction
process of moving from a general rule to a specific example
>
connotation
interpretive level of a word based on its associated images, contrast with denotation
induction
process of moving from a given series of specifics to a generalization
invective
a verbally abusive attack
reductio ad absurdum
comic effect, argumentative technique

indirect prove of a proposition

disproven by following its implications logically to an absurd consequence
syllogism
Logic A form of deductive reasoning consisting of a major premise, a minor premise, and a conclusion; for example, All humans are mortal, the major premise, I am a human, the minor premise, therefore, I am mortal, the conclusion.

general to specific >
syntax
grammatical structure of prose and poetry