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39 Cards in this Set

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  • Back
abstract
represent ideas or thoughts--generalities
aesthetic distance
a total objectivity of writer wherin his/her views and judgments are withheld in his/her account of human experience.
allegory
the recounting of an unreal series of experiences bearing such close resemblance to reality as to encourage the reader to make the association
ambiguity
lack of clarity in a work consciously used as a phase of the author's view of his/her world or characters and reflecting the vagueness of life
anachronism
the incorporation of an event, scene, or person who does not correspond with the time period portrayed inthe work
analogy
a comparison between two similar things
appolonian
refers to the noble qualities of human beings and nature
apologue
an allegorical story conveying a useful lesson; most frequently deals with animals or inanimate
archetype
a plot which repeats basic historical or primitive life patterns
bard
Modern: a poet
Historic: referred to poets who related stories of heroes to the accompaniment of a musical instrument such as the harp
baroque
an elaborate and unstructured style
bathos
the use of ludicrous, commonplace speech or writing; anticlimax
belles-lettres
a body of literature including drama, poetry, fiction, and criticism which is inherently artistic, as opposed to scientific writing
bombast
inflated language
burlesque
a literary composition that aims to provoke laughter by ridiculing serious works
caricature
a grotesque likeness of striking characteristics in person or things
carpe diem
one should enjoy life to the fullest
catharsis
a cleansing of the spirit of the spectator at a tragedy through experiencing the emotions of pity and terror
Classicism
implies objectivity and simplicity, restraint and formality
conceit
a figure of speech in which a striking association is made between two seemingly dissimilar things
concrete
things that have actual existence
denouement
the final resolution of the strands of plot, complications or problems
dues ex machina
the employment of any artificial device of gimmick that the author uses to solve a difficult situation
diction
the selection of words in oral or written discourse
dionysian
refers to the sensual pleasure-seeking qualities of man and nature
empathy
a feeling of association or identification with an object; experiencing its sensations and responding with similar feelings
epigram
the ingenious, witty, thoughtful, provocative statement ending a short poem
existentialism
a view of life that emphasizes existence as opposed to essence; human beings are presented as unable to solve basic enigmas of life
expressionism
a form of art in which the artist depicts the inner essence of man and projects his view of the world as colored by that essence
fable
a short story designed to teach a useful lesson; its characters are usually animals or inanimate things
fantasy
the creation of unreal worlds and people, bearing a relation to the real
genre
a term used to describe literary forms such as tragedy, comedy, novel, and essay
hamartia
aristotle's term for the protagonist's tragic flaq or tragic error judgment
hubris
aristotle's term for the pride of the tragic hero that leads him to ignore or overlook warnings of impending disaster or to break moral laws
humanism
in common usage, an attitude that emphasizes human interests; an optimistic view of human potential
humor
the quality in action, speech, or writing which excites amusement;less intellectual than wit and having a more sympathetic tone
impressionism
the presentation of the salient features of a scene, event, or person as the appear to the author at the time
invective
use of denunciatory, angry, and insulting language
irony
contrast between what is said and what is really happening