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21 Cards in this Set

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  • Back
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When was Naikan founded? by who?
the 1940's
by Yoshimoto Ishin
What was the origin of Naikan therapy and what was it's aim?
Mahayana Buddhist self-cultivation, called "mi shirabe"
to attain enlightenment
What does Naikan mean and how does this relate to healing?
"introspection" -- gaining insight into one's self and one's emotions seen as the path to healing
"nai"--inside
"kan"--looking
What are settings one can practice Naikan?
Naikan centers, hospitals, temples
What are the basics of Naikan practice?
lasts for one week, rise at 5-6 am, practice until 9 pm enclosed in small screen area, meals given to them periodically behind screen
What are Naikans three themes? How are they approached?
What have I received from this person? What have I given to this person? What trouble have I caused this person?
Recall past year by year from childhood to present, every 2 hours they report to practitioner for mensetsu (interview), reflect in terms of all people they have relations with
What are the effects of Naikan?
criminal recidivism, substance addiction, school refusal syndrome (hikikomori), mild depression/anxiety disorders, psychosomatic disorders (eating disorders)
Why is death important for Naikan healing?
Means of realizing impermanence--at death, one often reviews one’s life and seeks forgiveness from others - at this point it may be too late to repair relationships. Naikan allows people to do this while still alive and well, which creates a more constructive mental attitude with which to lead one’s life (e.g. near-death experience)
What is distinctive about the practitioner-client relation in Naikan?
?
What kind of “self-transformation” occurs in Naikan?
?
What is the notion of “healing” in Naikan? Mechanism?
gaining more insight into one's self and how ones emotional reactions have been conditioned, achieving a state of happiness (contentment, stability of mind, gratitude), realizing the interdependent nature of reality and one's self
"conceptual restructuring"--changing our reactions/interpretations of experiences
How is the “body-mind relation” understood in Naikan?
?
How do we think about “efficacy” in Naikan (how is it successful)?
1. Transformation of one's perception
2. less anger/sense of victimization and more peace of mind
3. enhanced sense of empowerment (sometimes leading one to seek forgiveness from others)
4. enhanced psychological and social well-being (MHC-SF)
Why does Naikan encourage clients to focus on remembering what they have received from other people (their kindness)?
Leads to an altered perception of the other and of themselves (become filled with gratitude rather than self-centeredness)
What is Noriko's story? How did her perception of her father change?
suffered from collagen disease, witnessed her father kill her mother and commit suicide
She began to see things from his perspective (he was sick) she remembered how much he loved her and was able to let go of her feelings of hatred -- realized her own self-centeredness
What is Keiko's story?
Suffered from anxiety neurosis, estranged from her mother and had list of reasons she disliked her
Realized how much love her mother had for her and learned to focus on the things she did for her instead of the things she did not do
What are the components of the Fourfold Perception Alteration that occurs as a result of Naikan?
1. altered perception of the other
2. altered perception of the self
3. altered perception of the illness/suffering
4. altered perception of the surroundings/change in the way the report their sensory experience
What is the source of mental suffering according to Naikan and vipassana?
1. Distorted perception of oneself, others, and society
2. Ignorance- not knowing reality as it is
Why does the sense of "self" change after Naikan?
It narrows the gap between the idealized version of oneself and real self
How is Naikan a means for realizing love and compassion?
By remembering the kindness of others, love and compassion develop
Why might Naikan be cross-culturally applicable?
Buddhism is not specific or unique to Japanese culture