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38 Cards in this Set

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.cshrc
The .cshrc file is one of the two startup files for the C shell that are read every time the user starts a shell or accesses a new shell. It gives information about the shell prompt, the number of command lines to be saved for future reference, and the custom commands that have been created.
.login
The .login file is one of the two startup files for the C shell. Whenever you log in to the system, the C shell looks for the .login and .cshrc files. The .login file stores information about the terminal being used and your shell prompt, as well as any application you want to run immediately after logging in.
.profile
The .profile file is the startup file in a Bourne or Korn shell. Whenever a user is added to the system, the system administrator copies the /etc/stdprofile file into the .profile file. This file contains the standard settings for that system, such as the type and path of the terminal being used.
/etc/passwd file
The /etc/passwd file is the system file used to keep track of all the login names and other user identifications needed by Unix.
/stand
System directory which contains all files and programs necessary to boot the Unixware system.
absolute pathnames
Absolute pathnames, or full pathnames, provide the exact location of the file in the directory structure, starting from the root directory.
Address Resolution Protocol (ARP)
Address Resolution Protocol (ARP) offers the network interface protocols in the data link layer the capability of translating Internet addresses into hardware addresses.
Advanced Interactive Executive (AIX)
The Advanced Interactive Executive is the Unixoperating system developed by IBM for its Unix-designated hardware platforms: RT6000, PS/2, and 370 VM. It is a multitasking, multiuser and time-sharing operating system. Two unique features of the AIX operating system are its SMIT command and the InfoExplorer program.
ARCserveIT
A backup management application bundled with the SCO Unixware 7 media kit.
artificial links
An artificial link is a file that contains the name of another file and its complete path. It links to a file that is either on a different file system on the same computer or maybe even on a different computer. These links are called artificial links because the names of the files are not considered by Unix to be the actual file names.
awk
The awk file-processing utility provides an easy way to state and perform various text manipulation tasks. Using this utility, you can generate reports containing selective columns from a structured text file.
backup partition
A backup partition is a hard disk partition that is used for backing up file systems and is always encouraged to be larger than the rest of the partitions.
Berkeley Software Distribution (BSD)
Berkeley Software Distribution (BSD) is a version of Unix developed by researchers at the University of California at Berkeley, who made modifications in Unix and added utilities such as the text editor vi and the C shell. This final version after inclusion of these modifications was named BSD.
bin directory
The bin directory in the Unix file system contains the most frequently used standard Unix programs and utilities necessary for running the system. The term bin, derived from binary, indicates that the programs are in executable form.
boot block
The boot block is one of the four sections of the file system. It is termed as block 0 and is the first block of a file system. It is reserved for storing the boot procedures.
Bourne shell
The Bourne shell is the original command processor developed at AT&T and named after its developer, Stephen R. Bourne. This is the fastest and most widely used shell. The executable file name is sh. The prompt used in this shell is dollar ($).
C shell
The C shell command processor was developed by William Joy and his colleagues at the University of California at Berkeley. The shell is named after its programming language, which resembles the C programming language syntactically. By default, the percent (%) sign on the terminal displays the C shell. The executable filename is .csh.
cal
The cal command lets you to display a calendar for any year from 1 A.D. to 9999 A.D.
calculators
The calculators dc and bc allow you to perform various computations on the screen. The dc calculator is a simple desktop calculator, while the bc calculator is a much more sophisticated and precise mathematical tool.
.cshrc
The .cshrc file is one of the two startup files for the C shell that are read every time the user starts a shell or accesses a new shell. It gives information about the shell prompt, the number of command lines to be saved for future reference, and the custom commands that have been created.
.login
The .login file is one of the two startup files for the C shell. Whenever you log in to the system, the C shell looks for the .login and .cshrc files. The .login file stores information about the terminal being used and your shell prompt, as well as any application you want to run immediately after logging in.
.profile
The .profile file is the startup file in a Bourne or Korn shell. Whenever a user is added to the system, the system administrator copies the /etc/stdprofile file into the .profile file. This file contains the standard settings for that system, such as the type and path of the terminal being used.
/etc/passwd file
The /etc/passwd file is the system file used to keep track of all the login names and other user identifications needed by Unix.
/stand
System directory which contains all files and programs necessary to boot the Unixware system.
absolute pathnames
Absolute pathnames, or full pathnames, provide the exact location of the file in the directory structure, starting from the root directory.
Address Resolution Protocol (ARP)
Address Resolution Protocol (ARP) offers the network interface protocols in the data link layer the capability of translating Internet addresses into hardware addresses.
Advanced Interactive Executive (AIX)
The Advanced Interactive Executive is the Unixoperating system developed by IBM for its Unix-designated hardware platforms: RT6000, PS/2, and 370 VM. It is a multitasking, multiuser and time-sharing operating system. Two unique features of the AIX operating system are its SMIT command and the InfoExplorer program.
ARCserveIT
A backup management application bundled with the SCO Unixware 7 media kit.
artificial links
An artificial link is a file that contains the name of another file and its complete path. It links to a file that is either on a different file system on the same computer or maybe even on a different computer. These links are called artificial links because the names of the files are not considered by Unix to be the actual file names.
awk
The awk file-processing utility provides an easy way to state and perform various text manipulation tasks. Using this utility, you can generate reports containing selective columns from a structured text file.
backup partition
A backup partition is a hard disk partition that is used for backing up file systems and is always encouraged to be larger than the rest of the partitions.
Berkeley Software Distribution (BSD)
Berkeley Software Distribution (BSD) is a version of Unix developed by researchers at the University of California at Berkeley, who made modifications in Unix and added utilities such as the text editor vi and the C shell. This final version after inclusion of these modifications was named BSD.
bin directory
The bin directory in the Unix file system contains the most frequently used standard Unix programs and utilities necessary for running the system. The term bin, derived from binary, indicates that the programs are in executable form.
boot block
The boot block is one of the four sections of the file system. It is termed as block 0 and is the first block of a file system. It is reserved for storing the boot procedures.
Bourne shell
The Bourne shell is the original command processor developed at AT&T and named after its developer, Stephen R. Bourne. This is the fastest and most widely used shell. The executable file name is sh. The prompt used in this shell is dollar ($).
C shell
The C shell command processor was developed by William Joy and his colleagues at the University of California at Berkeley. The shell is named after its programming language, which resembles the C programming language syntactically. By default, the percent (%) sign on the terminal displays the C shell. The executable filename is .csh.
cal
The cal command lets you to display a calendar for any year from 1 A.D. to 9999 A.D.
calculators
The calculators dc and bc allow you to perform various computations on the screen. The dc calculator is a simple desktop calculator, while the bc calculator is a much more sophisticated and precise mathematical tool.