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58 Cards in this Set

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What are the 3 types of MHC?
Class 1 - ABC
Class 2 - DR, DP, DQ
Class 3 - Complement related
what cells have MHC Class 1?
1: all nucleated cells except neurons and striated muscle
what cells have MHC class 2?
-B cells
-mono/macrophages
-Activated Tcells
-Intestinal epithelial cells.
What is Primary lymphoid tissue?
Bone marrow
Thymus
What is 2ndary lymphoid tissue?
Lymph nodes
Spleen
Bone Marrow
what are the important T-cell markers?
1-5, 7/8
What is CD1 on?
Thymocytes
What is CD2?
E-rosette marker
What is CD3 on?
Mature T-cells, associated with TCR
What is CD4 on?
Helper T-cells
What is CD5?
Pan t-cell
What is CD7?
pan-tcell
What is CD8 on?
Suppressor/cytotoxic T-cells
What are the 4 Tcell types?
-Helper
-DTH
-Suppressor
-Cytotoxic
What CD and MHC are assoc w/:
-T Helper cells?
-T cytotoxic cells?
Th = CD4 and MHCII

Tc = CD8 and MHCI
Which cells are the major effectors in graft rejection?
Tc cells
What is required from Th cells to stimulate Tc cells?
IL-2
What is the normal value of Tcells?
70-85% of all lymphs
What percent of all lymphs is
-Th cells?
-Tc cells?
Thelper = 50-60%
Tcytoxc = 20-25%
What is the normal Th/Tc ratio?
2:1
What are the important Bcell markers?
-CD10/CD19/CD20
-sIg
-HLA-DR
What is CD10?
What is its importance?
CALLA early pre-B marker, important in childhood leukemia
What is CD19?
pan B-cell
What is CD20?
Pan B-cell
What is sIg? What is its importance?
Surface Immunoglobulin, if detected it confirms its a B
What is HLA-DR?
Class II MHC
What are characteristics of a T-independent Bcell response?
-IgM production only
-No memory
-Only certain Ag's induce
-Specific
-Ag's removed by RES or C'
What type of gammopathy is seen in a T-indep. Bcell response?
Monoclonal - each cell has only 1 heavy/1lite chain.
What is the normal Bcell percent of all lymphs?
10-15%
Where in the body are the most Bcells?
Lymph nodes and Spleen
What is the normal percent of NK cells in all lymphs?
10%
How do NK cells kill?
-ADCC
-Lymphokine-stimulated
What are the important markers on NK cells?
CD16
CD56
CD57
How is an absolute T4 or T8 cell count calculated?
Absolute lymph x % of Tcell
What type of receptor do macrophages/monocytes have lots of?
Fc receptor
Can macro/monos bind any cell?
No; need a receptor.
What can macros/monos recognize?
Cells coated w/ Ab
Cells coated w/ Complement
How do Macro/Monos function?
-Antigen processing
-Antigen presentation
What happens when Macro/monos present antigen?
They secrete Il-1 to assist Tcell prolif and IL-2 prod.
What is the normal range for MAcro/monos?
132-770/uL
Where are the majority of macro/monos found?
In the tissues - 400x more than in circulation.
What are the important cell markers on macro/monos?
CD14, CD4 (dim), HLA-DR
List the congenital primary T-cell disorders:
1. Digeorge's Syndrome
2. Nezeloff Syndrome
List the acquired primary T-cell disorders:
1. AIDS
2. Autoimmune
3. Lymphoid malignancy
List the congenital primary B-cell disorders:
1. Bruton's X-linked agammaglobulinemia
2. Selective IgA deficiency
3. CVID
4. Hyper IgM Syndrome
List the acquired primary B-cell disorders:
1. Autoimmune
2. Malignancies
3. CVID
List the combined immunodeficiencies:
1. SCIDS
2. Wiscott-Aldrich Syndrome
3. CID
4. Ataxia-Telangiectasia
Quickly, what is another name for CID (comb. immunodef)?
Bare lymph syndrome - no DR
What 2 basic types of lab tests are done to differentiate the cmi's?
1. Functional assays
2. Cell marker analysis by flow
What are the 2 functional assay types?
1. Mitogens
2. MLC
what is the basic principle of functional assays?
Utilize radio-labeled thymadine uptake to show proliferation.
What are mitogens?
Things in nature that stimulate proliferation.
what is mlc?
mixed lymphocyte cultures
what is the principle of MLC?
also uses radio-labeled thymadine uptake to illustrate proliferation of cells.
List 3 Mitogens:
PHA - phytohemagglutinin
pwm - pokeweed mitogen
ConA - Concanaalin A
What do the mitogens stimulate?
-PHA
-PWM
-ConA
PHA stimulates Tcell prolifn.
PWM stimulates T/B cells
ConA stimulates Tc cells
How does MLC differ from mitogens?
The stimulation comes from irradiated lymphs, placed in culture with the test lymphs.
What sample types can flow cytometry be used on?
-blood
-bone marrow
-tissue