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25 Cards in this Set

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irony
in its original Greek sense means the pretense of ignorance in order to ridicule a person or to expose the truth abut a situation
limited third-person point of view
the story is told by an outside observer who views the action from the vantage point of a single character in the story
metaphor
a figure of speechin which a word or phrase that ordinarily designates one thing is used to designate another, thus making an implict comparison, as in "a sea of troubles"
moral
a lesson or tule about how to live
motivation
the reaons why the character acts as he or she does
onmiscienct point of view
the narrator is a godlike observer who knows everything that is going on in the story
parody
a humorous imitation of a serious work or of a particular style of writing
protagonist
the main character in a story
public symbols
symbols in our culture that we know and recognize at once
reolution/denouement
all the problems are resolved and the story is "closed"
sarcasm
a form of wit that is marked by the use of cruel language and is intended to make its victim the butt of contempt or ridicule
satire
any writing that uses ridicule to bring about social reform
setting
the time and place of the story
simile
a figure of speech in which two unlike things are compared, often in a phrase introduced by like or as, as in "How like the winter hath my absence been." (Shakespeare)
situation irony
describes an occurrence that is the opposite of what we expected
stanard English
the formal way of speaking and writing taught in schools
static character
remains the same throughout the story
stock character
fits our preconceived notions about a "type"; lacks individuality
suspense
the uncertainty or anxiety we feel about what is going to happen next in the story
symbol
an object that suggests an idea
theme
the central idea or insight of a work of literature
tone
the attitude a speaker or writer takes toward a subject, audience or character
verbal irony
saying one thing but meaning the opposite
verisimilitude
truth or believability
vignette
a very short literary sketch, often one that is suggestive and poetic in style