Study your flashcards anywhere!

Download the official Cram app for free >

  • Shuffle
    Toggle On
    Toggle Off
  • Alphabetize
    Toggle On
    Toggle Off
  • Front First
    Toggle On
    Toggle Off
  • Both Sides
    Toggle On
    Toggle Off
  • Read
    Toggle On
    Toggle Off
Reading...
Front

How to study your flashcards.

Right/Left arrow keys: Navigate between flashcards.right arrow keyleft arrow key

Up/Down arrow keys: Flip the card between the front and back.down keyup key

H key: Show hint (3rd side).h key

A key: Read text to speech.a key

image

Play button

image

Play button

image

Progress

1/38

Click to flip

38 Cards in this Set

  • Front
  • Back
animism
Belief in souls or doubles.
cargo cults
Postcolonial, acculturative, religious movements common in Melanesia that attempt to explain Euopean domination and wealth and to achieve similar success magically by mimicking European behavior.
communal religions
In Wallace's typology, these religions have in addition to shamanic cults communal cults in which people organize community rituals such as harvest ceremonies and rites of passage.
communitas
Intense community spirit, a feeling of great social solidarity, equality, and togetherness; characteristic of people experiencing liminality together.
leveling mechanism
Customs and social actions that operate to reduce differences in wealth and thus to bring standouts in line with community norms.
liminality
The critically important marginal or in-between phase of a rite of passage.
magic
Use of supernatural techniques to accomplish specific aims.
mana
Sacred impersonal force in Melanesian and Polynesian religions.
monotheism
Worship of an eternal, omniscient, omnipotent, and omnipresent supreme being.
Olympian religions
In Wallace's typology, develop with state organization; have full-time religious specialists professional priesthoods.
animism
Belief in souls or doubles.
cargo cults
Postcolonial, acculturative, religious movements common in Melanesia that attempt to explain Euopean domination and wealth and to achieve similar success magically by mimicking European behavior.
communal religions
In Wallace's typology, these religions have in addition to shamanic cults communal cults in which people organize community rituals such as harvest ceremonies and rites of passage.
communitas
Intense community spirit, a feeling of great social solidarity, equality, and togetherness; characteristic of people experiencing liminality together.
leveling mechanism
Customs and social actions that operate to reduce differences in wealth and thus to bring standouts in line with community norms.
liminality
The critically important marginal or in-between phase of a rite of passage.
magic
Use of supernatural techniques to accomplish specific aims.
mana
Sacred impersonal force in Melanesian and Polynesian religions.
monotheism
Worship of an eternal, omniscient, omnipotent, and omnipresent supreme being.
Olympian religions
In Wallace's typology, develop with state organization; have full-time religious specialists professional priesthoods.
animism
Belief in souls or doubles.
cargo cults
Postcolonial, acculturative, religious movements common in Melanesia that attempt to explain Euopean domination and wealth and to achieve similar success magically by mimicking European behavior.
communal religions
In Wallace's typology, these religions have in addition to shamanic cults communal cults in which people organize community rituals such as harvest ceremonies and rites of passage.
communitas
Intense community spirit, a feeling of great social solidarity, equality, and togetherness; characteristic of people experiencing liminality together.
leveling mechanism
Customs and social actions that operate to reduce differences in wealth and thus to bring standouts in line with community norms.
liminality
The critically important marginal or in-between phase of a rite of passage.
magic
Use of supernatural techniques to accomplish specific aims.
mana
Sacred impersonal force in Melanesian and Polynesian religions.
monotheism
Worship of an eternal, omniscient, omnipotent, and omnipresent supreme being.
Olympian religions
In Wallace's typology, develop with state organization; have full-time religious specialists professional priesthoods.
polytheism
Belief in several deities who control aspects of nature.
religion
Beliefs and rituals concerned with supernatural beings, powers, and forces.
revitalization movements
Movements that occur in times of change, in which religious leaders emerge and undertake to alter or revitalize a society.
rites of passage
Culturally defined activities associated with the transition from one place or stage of life to another.
shaman
A part-time religious practitioner who mediates between ordinary people and supernatural beings and forces.
taboo
Prohibition backed by supernatural sanctions.
(i.e In Polynesia, mana wasn't potentially available to everyone but was attached to political offices. Chiefs and nobles had more mana than ordinary people. So charged were these chiefs with mana that contact with them was dangerous. Because they had so much mana, their bodies and possessions were taboo (sacred and off-limits to ordinary people).
rituals
Formal, stylized, repetitive, and stereotyped. People perform them in special (sacred) places and at set times. Rituals include liturgical orders -- sequences of words and actions invented propr to the current performance of the ritual in which they occur. Rituals are 'social acts'. By taking part in a joint public act, the performers signal they accept a common moral and social order, one that transcends their status as individuals.
totemism
Totems can be animals, plants, or geographical features. Common in religions of Native Australians or Native Americans. Members of each totemic group believed themselves to be descendants of their totem. They had annual rites and ceremonies dedicated to the totem.
Totemism uses nature as a model for society. Totems are usually animals or plants, which are part of nature. People relate to nature through their totemic association with natural species. Because each group has a different totem, social differences mirror natural contrasts.
Totems are sacred emblems symbolizing common identity (North Pacific Coast Native Americans as well as universitites and sports teams)