Women's suffrage in New Zealand

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    Women's Enfranchisement

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    Amongst the organisations advocating for women’s enfranchisement, another with prominence was the Dunedin Tailoresses Union [DTU] formed in 1889. The depressed economic situation in New Zealand during the 1880s led to “sweated labour.” Men and women alike worked for long hours and low wages in overcrowded conditions. Factory worker Miss M recalls “I made 12s 6d one week, but that meant working till three o’clock some mornings… and on Sunday, too” (Paul, 1910, as cited in Dalley & Robertson, 1984). For this reason, the DTU sought to improve working conditions for women through campaigning for suffrage. The DTU collaborated with the WCTU to spread the word of the suffrage campaign through petitions. While the WCTU appealed to many older, unmarried…

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    The 1890s is known as the first-wave of feminism in New Zealand. During this period New Zealand woman and women 's groups such as The Women 's Christian Temperance movement began to campaign for issues that were important to them, including women 's suffrage. In 1893, after a tireless effort from many, New Zealand became the first country to grant women the vote. In this essay I am going to discuss the origins of the suffrage campaign including; The Women 's Christian Temperance Movement and…

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    Women have fought to be considered equal for an extended period of time in history. To this day, women are still fighting for their rights. The women’s rights movement started primarily in the 1920’s in the United States. One of the goals of the movement was to let women vote: women’s suffrage. This influenced the era of the 1920’s by showing that women had a voice and could stand up for equality. It impacted today’s society by starting a revolution of events that help to create equality between…

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    moved from England to Christchurch in 1868, where she joined the New Zealand chapter of the Women’s Christian Temperance Movement (the WCTU). The WCTU is an international organisation made to campaign for the prohibition of liquor, and a life free from the vices of alcohol, tobacco, and other drugs. Sheppard, and the WCTU, aimed to promote temperance, and realised that if women could vote temperance would be more easily achieved, because many women were supportive or not opposed to temperance.…

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    gathered in Seneca Falls, New York; to discuss the issues of women’s rights. At that moment men's rights were exposed to many countries at the time, no matter the wealth that they had. Women began fighting for equal rights. The women got together and talked about that all the women's deserve all the rights and responsibilities just like the men. First, Women’s Suffrage at the time was also called the (Women’s Movement) it was mainly focused on having the women have rights, for voting and being…

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    called “The Suffrage Hike for Women’s Rights.” The biggest leading cause one of their march was for women to be able to vote. Their biggest achievements was in 1920 when they had won the right to vote. In 1920 women had won votes from people all around the nation. It took seventy two years of protest and rallies, but it was all worth it. New Zealand was founded on September 26, 1907 by the Australian Federation. New Zealand is an island country in the southern Pacific Ocean. The…

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    The Suffrage - Word vs. Violence “I do not wish them [women] to have power over men; but over themselves.” This simple line written by Mary Wollstonecraft in her book A vindication of the rights of Woman (1758) produce a sentiment that many today takes for granted; The right for a woman to have power over herself, to live her own life and to vote. The sadness in this remark is that it would take another 160 years before all women in Britain over the age of 30 with the minimum property…

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    Māori culture has remained a huge part throughout my upbringing. I have been able to recognise the importance which has been encouraged throughout my studies, more now than ever. The role I will play as a treaty partner approaches the importance of having familiarity of New Zealand history alongside skills (Lang, 2002) essential to have an effective outcome in my practice as an Early Childhood Educator. To achieve a positive outcome in my practice I will educate myself with the significant…

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    New Zealand troops have spent more time in Afghanistan then both World War One and World War Two Combined, despite this, mainstream media coverage of the war has been limited, and one-sided, government reports have relied on embedded journalism and the NZDF methods of public relations (PR), have been responsible for the upkeep of the military’s positive, peacekeeping, reconstructed, ‘kiwi’ image. While this was not untrue, it can not be considered truthful. The NZDF maintains strong connections…

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    Ideology Of Child Poverty

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    than about the lack of food and there are many factors that causes child poverty. These child poverty indicators and factors are things such as income poverty, living conditions or housing, material hardships, education, and poor physical and mental health. (Child Poverty Monitor, 2015). O’Brien, in Beddoe & Maidment (2009), suggests that there are six possible main causes of child poverty, which include the lack of advocacy and knowledge, decreasing support for egalitarianism, costs, dominance…

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