Urban decay

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    Essay On Urban Sprawl

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    Some people say that there is a difference between urban and suburban sprawl. Mrs. Lowry states that urban and suburban sprawl is the same thing as urban sprawl is people leaving the cities for housing options that allow them to spread out more but still close enough to the city to work. This is exactly was suburban sprawl is. However, suburban areas encourage more commuting as it takes longer to get from place to place, which increases gas emissions, and using farmlands as land for new housing…

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    New Haven Essay

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    which is known as the “Nine Square Plan.” The founders of New Haven wanted to create a strong realm of commercial business in the spacious harbor of Long Island; They were even hopeful to have control as far south as the Delaware Bay. New Haven’s urban development experienced many ups and downs in its’urban development. ("New Haven | Connecticuthistory.Org") In its early years of establishments, the city experienced great economic prosperity. In 1640, a new government formed. New Haven has…

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    Walking down the sidewalks of Roland Park and Middle East, you can clearly see an inequality between their neighbourhood resources and the implications of the communities’ respective histories. Whereas Middle East seems to be experiencing a period of revitalization, clearly spearheaded by the nearby Johns Hopkins institutions, Roland Park portrays a stable, deep-rooted past of affluency. These physical conditions impact the wellbeing of residents and thus fall under the umbrella term of social…

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    Urban Sprawl Summary

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    Summary: Open Space and Urban Sprawl Salman Khan 59574103 Introduction Rapid urbanization triggers the introduction of policies designed to preserve open spaces in an area. However the same policies designed for this purpose may actually contribute to expansion of the urban fringe and “leapfrog development”. The major conflict unveiled by the results is the controversy over preserving open space within private lots or at the urban fringe (accessible to public) problems associated with…

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    Martin Zebracki’s article Beyond Public Artopia: Public art as perceived by its publics, discusses public art and how the people who pass by it interact with it. This type of art can serve as a way to reinvigorate urban development, and Zebracki examines the perception of the public with reference to several specific public art installments. Public art integrates the location into the art and allows the piece to become a part of the city. Barcelona is a city where public art has become an…

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    of the social, political and economic relationship in cities. One of those urbanization sociologists to have put in a lot of effort to study urbanization was a Professor of city planning called Lewis Munford. He was also an “architectural critic, urban planner, and historian who analyzed the effects of technology and urbanization on human societies throughout history” (Encyclopedia Britanica). His profile can justify the sociological, historical and economically rich articulations in his…

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    In many parts of the world people are facing the effects of overpopulation and the process called urban sprawl appearing more often (Randolph). This urban sprawl is a direct result of overpopulating a region with an inadequate room for growth (Randolph). It involves stretching the urban boundaries further and further, thus consuming precious farm land and many other types of land use (Randolph). This realization of a population and space crisis is what has driven only a few cities in the United…

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    Public Transportation Systems for Urban Areas Objective: Introduction: 1. Urban Public Transportation Systems: Cities and metropolitan areas are centers of diverse activities, which require efficient and convenient transportation of persons and gods. It is often said that transportation is the lifeblood of cities. High density of activities makes it possible and necessary that high capacity modes, such as bus, light rail and metro, be used because they are more economical, more energy efficient…

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    citizens is an important factor in urban planning, settlement and management. Hence, there is a need of a participatory citizen centric planning of urban settlement based on spatial data. These perception and expectation may be represented in terms of emotions. Determining Urban Emotions is an approach which can be used to map different types of emotions associated with urbanization. In the recent years, some new methods have been presented for the area of urban and spatial planning, resulting…

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    different land-use models and main characteristics of urbanization help to plan and provide facilities for the needs of increasing urban populations more easily. Urbanization is the process where a large number of population become concentrated living in urban area. Urbanization is about changing distribution of world urban population and settlement. Natural increase of urban urbanization can occur either by natural population…

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