United States federal public land legislation

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    there was a "widespread concern about overcutting forests, flooding, and erosion..." (Sowards) throughout the United States. Many people were not aware of the environmental damage that their actions could lead to during this time period. As seen in the late 1800s, Americans hunted for bison, resulting in the extinction of the species. Likewise, as cities throughout the nation began to grow and overpopulate, pollution was an issue and was harming animal and plant life, along with the land itself. Just as Theodore Roosevelt was entering his first term as president in 1901, questions concerning conservation arose. Going forward, several acts and laws were passed in order to preserve and protect…

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    which consent is required before disclosure • Educational records: all records related to a student maintained by the agency or institution; documents, computer media, video, film, photographs SOX, Sarbanes-Oxley Act, Public Company Accounting Reform and Investor Protection Act, more commonly known as SOX was named after Senator Paul Sarbanes and Representative Michael Oxley. SOX’s main purpose is the protect shareholders and investors from financial fraud. It created increased corporate…

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    administration spans more than 100 years (Our history, 2011). Laws passed in the 1880’s implemented three elements to our immigration policies: “(a) restrictions based on personal characteristics, (b) restrictions based on national origin, (c) protection of American labor” (Laque, 2010, p. 5). When the federal government took over immigration in 1891 the Office of Superintendent of Immigration was part of the Treasury Department (Our history, 2011). Through the years the Office of Superintendent…

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    Magnum Opus, one must look at the history of those immigrants, and how they have been treated in the United States. The United States has taken form due the cultures and experiences of immigrants from around the world. While the early years of immigration mostly consisted of Irish and English…

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    Policies associated with immigration laws stem back in history, as early as 1790. Beginning with the Naturalization Act of 1790, as the first statute that imposed regulations on citizenship. The Act included criteria, such as two years of residency, good behavior and allegiance to the United States. Notwithstanding, those excluded from citizenship included blacks and children of fathers not born in the U.S. Inevitably, this representation of segregation took part in the restructuring of…

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    A second Act that is worth mentioning is the Chinese Exclusion Act, this was the first time that United States passed a law that would not allow entry to a specific ethnic group in this case from China, Japan or any other Oriental countries. The act was targeting mainly Chinese workers, those who were unskilled and even those who were skilled but, they did make small exceptions with teachers, students, or officials. Middle class Chinese workers first became interested in the United States during…

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    Canada is one of the four countries in the world that have maintained a federal structure for more than 100 years (the rest are The United States of America, Switzerland and Australia). Like other true federations, Canada has a constitution that gives the legislative body of each of its federated states the exclusive power to adopt and enforce laws in its territory on a large number of subjects. Among the subjects that the Constitution attributes exclusively to "provincial" legislatures are…

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    Environmental Ethics

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    I Introduction The environmental movement has been underway for some time now with the intent on protecting the environment. Through this movement there has been many different agencies formed in the United States Federal Government to help protect the environment. The values and missions of these agencies are not what they seem and do not protect the environment as one should think they would. They strive more to meet the needs human needs than those of the environment. When thinking of…

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    objective was not destructive of trusts, but a concern that the public not suffer unduly because of trusts.” The coal strike of 1902 would usher in a new kind of progressive politics. TR would make his wish for government intervention a reality with the advent of his trust busting campaign. Roosevelt would use the power of the executive branch as a means form dismantling monopolies in the private sector. A prime example of TR’s trust-busting policies was his 1902 battle with Northern…

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    Some people believe that a strong central government is a more effective way of governance while others believe a stronger state and local government is better. This paper will further explore the advantages and disadvantages of each argument; as well as analyze the role of federal government and state government in the policy area of same sex marriage. There are several advantages of a strong central government. First of all, a strong federal government is more likely to be more efficient in…

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