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    the oppression and gender disparity found within colleges. In an age of many obligations and few choices, the 1800s soon became a pivotal turning point for women. Many colleges were soon being built or repurposed to offer women comparative education similar to what men were receiving (National Women 's History Museum). Today, stemming from women 's activism, educational rights have become an aspect obtainable by both genders. Furthermore, every person deserves equal rights to all educational opportunities regardless of gender roles. Although major legislation has alleviated gender inequality within the educational sector, inadequacies still exist. Consider the fact that "two thirds of the world 's 775 million illiterates" are women (UNESCO). The culture a person grows up in greatly impacts the activities that the person pursues (Schalkwyk). Reflectively, various people in society believed that girls did not necessitate an education and should otherwise be at home taking care of a family unit. Many regions and religions of the world still sustain this principle and tradition. For example, one religion that follows this way of life is Islam (Abbasi). The reasoning behind the belief is that their God voiced the doctrine that women should be at home with the children and not working (Abbasi). Muslims strongly believe in their religion and, although not all Muslims follow this practice, they abide by the rules and women do not pursue an education (Abassi). Another reason…

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    Since 1948 following the Pronouncement of Universal Human Rights, Education has officially been recognized as a fundamental human right. Moreover, it has been acknowledged through numerous accords such as the “United Nations Educational, Scientific, and Cultural Organization” (UNESCO), the “Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination against Women,” and the “International Covenant on Economics, Social, and Cultural Rights.” These treaties established the entitlement of children…

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    Vanishing Voices Analysis

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    endangerment. Because learning prominent languages has economic and political benefits, as shown the economic, historical and political perspective, the most important thing that can be done to keep a language from disappearing is to create favourable conditions for its speakers to speak the language and teach it to their children. As proven by United Nation Resolutions, particularly issued by the the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization, this often requires national…

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    Introduction A number of contentions have been put forth over the years which are based on the political system’s role in implementing policies to ensure that education is for the mass and not just for the minority. In light of this we will discuss Plato’s “Allegory of the Cave” and its implications for Jamaica’s political system in relations to education, poverty and linkages to crime. In Jamaica lack of education has been linked not only to unemployment but also poverty and crime. An…

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    In the mid 1800s, the desire for public education began to strive, as many American children were not given the oppurtunity to attend public school and learn vital information that would be crucial to their adulthood. Horace Mann, also known as “the father of American public schools,” led this movement for public education. Mann was born in 1796 and grew up with his poor family in Franklin, Massachusettes. Throughout his childhood, Mann would go to the Franklin public library, with the few…

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    Rock Art Research Paper

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    relations between indigenous communities and anthropologists, making actual collaboration and consultation much more difficult from the outset. It takes a long time to build trusting relationships but not very long to break those down again. To fix problems such as this Robert G. Benarik, the Covener and Editior-in-Chief of the International Federation of Rock Art Organizations, suggests that the “existing structures [be] replaced with a consultancy system that is equitable, that protects the…

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    Case Study Of Macao

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    been observed a SWOT analysis will be performed to determine whether the Maluku islands should apply for the UWHL. The Maluku islands are an archipelago in Indonesia which has an economy based on agriculture, fishing, and ocassionally handcraft items (Maluku Islands, n.d.). A SWOT analysis will scrutinize the pro and cons of the internal stucture of the Maluku islands for applying to the UWHL to increase tourists and the analysis also looks at the external factors that could be beneficial or…

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    1.0 What Is Labour Education? Labour education refers to a different kind of schooling for union members. This is all about learning about the issues in the workplace and beyond. This education helps to know how to handle grievances as well as how to negotiate contracts while ensuring health and safety on the job with exercising labour and human rights. Such an education is helpful to understand politics and economy of the country. According to Schmidt (2007) that labour education is critical…

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    Education is about life of each individual person working as a tool for supporting social and economic development of all. Education empowers people with the knowledge of realizing the value of human pride and destiny. Through education, people can contribute as active members of the society in which they live as well as citizens of a large global society, socially, economically and politically. Education empower learners and lead them to the right judgment pertaining their lives, learn their…

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    Increasing access to quality education, including the marginalized would lead to development, reduces poverty, improve the wellbeing, and freedom of people. Constantly, denied quality education access for the marginalized children, according to Stark (2009), compels them to a limited life span. Children from poor families suffer from poor health, malnutrition, school uncertainties, dirty water, and poor sanitation, and above all, they are exposed to illness, exploitation, injustice, abuse,…

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