Tokugawa shogunate

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    Question:Discuss the impact of the Tokugawa Shogunate on Japan Introduction: The Tokugawa Shogunate was the last feudal military government in Japan and ushered a new era of growth where Japan was not on the brink of civil war and was rapidly growing.There were many impacts on Japan,firstly there was great cultural growth and popularization of traditional and new cultures,from this there were also social and economic changes.These changes impacted Japan and still has effects on the modern day Japan. ARGUMENT 1: Source 1(PRIMARY) If
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    The Tokugawa Shogunate was a period when peace reigned throughout Japan and the Daimyo were able to be brought under control. This period was called the Tokugawa period also known as the Edo period. This was also a period when Japan was cut off from the rest of the world. The daimyo were one of the great lords of Japan (shogun above them) who had many samurais under their control. Oda Nobunaga, a Japanese warrior and government official, decided in 1568 to conquer the daimyo and gain control…

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    Tokugawa Shogunate Essay

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    Towards the beginning of the Tokugawa Shogunate, Tokugawa Ieyasu (shogun at the time), issued an edict that prevented Japanese from leaving Japan, and closed Japan to all foreigners. This brought 250 years of peace to the country. In July 1853, US Commodore Perry was the first foreigner to gain access into the closed country during this period. This event lead to the demise of the Tokugawa Shogunate, as Perry influenced other countries to do the same. With the sudden opening of its doors to…

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    Over the following centuries the power of the emperor and the imperial court gradually declined and passed to the military clans and their armies of samurai warriors. The Minamoto clan under Minamoto no Yoritomo emerged victorious from the Genpei War of 1180–85. After seizing power, Yoritomo set up his capital in Kamakura and took the title of shogun. In 1274 and 1281, the Kamakura shogunate withstood two Mongol invasions, but in 1333 it was toppled by a rival claimant to the shogunate, ushering…

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    Ryoma Sakamoto Ryoma, born in 1835 and died in 1867, was an anti-tokugawa samurai who revolutionarily influenced not only the nation but, societal beliefs, values, cultural behaviours, political endeavours and Japan itself. The significance of his legacy continues to inspire and express the importance of equality and pride for the country he belonged to. His outspoken actions and decisions throughout his life go on to modify modern day Japanese society and make him the significant historic…

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    importance of material culture as actors in the historical context, and its effects and implications in elite warrior societies through visualization. The book develops along Tokugawa Ieyasu’s career from when he was still a hostage to his retirement, reflecting his skills…

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    Decolonization Of Japan

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    get his honor back, but, of course, after he does seppuku he would be dead. In my opinion, if I were a British commander and was battling a Japanese insurgency, I would feel a little uneasy when I watch these warriors fight against all odds instead of surrendering. These warriors were taught that to die in battle was the greatest honor. There was British, French, and American involvement during the Boshin Civil War; although there was Western involvement, it was only in the form of military…

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    his birth. The Shimazu clan were of notable prestige in that they were the only clan that received foreign ambassadors in a time when, under the orders of the Tokugawa Shogunate (the shogunate was a council of military commanders led primarily by a single domain), Japan strictly prohibited international travel. Saigō was part of this renowned ancestry and throughout his life, whether by circumstance or fate, became an important part in Japanese politics both internally and internationally. More…

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    in Aizu’s Mutsu province, which now lies in the Fukushima Prefecture, to Gonpachi Yamamoto, a samurai and gunnery instructor, and Saku Yamamoto. From a young age Yae was fascinated with the work her father and her older brother, Kakuma, did. Because of her constant begging and determination she convinced her father to let her learn gunnery, which for a woman of her time was very unusual as most women in Aizu actually were taught to use a Naginata. In 1865 she married Shonosuke Kawasaki a friend…

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    Tokugawa shogunate, following the warring period of Japan, became the last era of samurai’s ruling and the final feudal military government. During this period, the statues of different class and groups began to slightly change, and also, the roles of samurais were different from the earlier periods including late Heian period, Kamaruka and Muromachi eras. In the Tale of Heike, the samurais emphasized the bravery and loyalty of samurais, showing us that samurais played important roles at that…

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