The Man Who Mistook His Wife for a Hat

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    nucleotide to heart as a whole organ. I particularly found interest in the module ‘Cell recognition and the immune system’ where I throughly enjoyed learning about HIV, how the structure of the virus and how it replicates leads ultimately to the deterioration of our immune system. Viruses and genetic diseases is a topic I have deep interest in and would like to continue with into my further education. Chemistry complements my biology well especially in those topics linked to biology. Geography has allowed me to improve my written answer skills where I have learnt to write . I enjoy being able to see the biology in the physical systems we study. An interest of mine lies in Neuroscience which first began when I read ‘ The Man Who Mistook His Wife for a Hat’ by Oliver Sacks. The book entails a series of extraordinary tales which provide a remarkable insight to patients dealing with neurological disorders. What interests me is the preciseness of the human brain that is conveyed in the book, how seemingly ‘useless’ brain damaged patients on the outside are gifted with hidden talents. How different approaches of ‘systematic’ or ‘art’ therapy’s can help in leading to these brain damaged individuals recovery’s or everyday well-being. This prompted me to read the book ‘Do No Harm’ by Henry Marsh which provided a more physical insight to the anatomy of the human brain and the problems that can arise. Reading stimulates my passion to learn and has led me to weekly read the New…

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    molecular sequences drive such incredible beings to function. What I find most intriguing, is the superior organ of our physique- the brain. It governs the action of the human body and causes each person to behave in a different way to others regardless of our similar anatomy. This, is what I believe, creates our exceedingly diverse population. Attending a Neuroscience masterclass held at University College London enabled me to analyse human brains and we discussed the anatomy, roles of the…

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    In the book The Man Who Mistook His Wife For A Hat by Oliver Sacks, the author describes odd psychological phenomenons in which he’s had personal experience with. Sacks describes multiple patients with lack, in the first part of his book, and patients with abundances, in the second part of the book, and transfer, in the third part of his book, of physiological features or abilities. The first of the studies in this book that were found the most interesting is the inspiration of the title. Dr.…

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    The Man who Mistook His Wife for a Hat is a collection of short stories telling of people with abnormal brain disorders. These stories are written by Oliver Sacks, who has either witnessed the affected people and how their brain works, or has heard about them, and transferred these stories into short clinical tales, some of which being published in other books, such as ‘Witty Ticcy Ray’ and ‘Reminiscence’ in the London Review of Books. Sacks is the common character throughout each of the 24…

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    talking about reality, Stacks suggests “A man needs such a narrative, a continuous inner narrative, to maintain his identity, his self […] Unable to maintain a genuine narrative or continuity, unable to maintain a genuine inner world, he is driven to the proliferation of pseudo-narratives” (Sacks, 1998, p. 111). When thinking of the idea of our inner narrative I began viewing the mind as its own separate sphere then the nervous system. The brain is physical and obeys physical laws but our minds…

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    The man who explored the mysteries of the human brain in a series of best-selling books succumbed to cancer at the age of 82. According to a report from Daily Mail, renowned neurologist and writer Oliver Sacks, who announced last February that he has rare eye cancer that had spread, died at the age of 82 today, August 30. Sacks, who had lived in New York since 1965, authored several other books about unusual medical conditions, including The Man Who Mistook His Wife For A Hat and The Island Of…

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    In The Man Who Mistook His Wife for a Hat, there are two case studies of proprioception. Proprioception is described as our “sixth sense”. As Dr. Oliver Sacks explains, we have five senses but there are other senses that are considered secret-senses or sixth senses which are just as vital as the other senses but go unrecognized. “It is the awareness of the relative position of the trunk and limbs, derived from receptors in the joints and tendons.” For normal people, in normal situations, these…

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    The title is a very basic representation of what’s inside, it is strange enough to draw the reader’s attention, after all it is a pretty weird story to say, “The Man Who Mistook His Wife for a Hat” But it is also one of the most representative of the fact that it is a collection of neurological cases because it actually implies something being wrong with the brain, while other titles such as “The Lost Mariner”, “The Disembodied Lady”, “Witty Ticcy Ray”, “The Dog Beneath the Skin”, and “Rebecca”…

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    In the hands of one less skilled, the novel “The Man Who Mistook His Wife for a Hat” may have well been little more than a book of records, a compilation of strange neurological tribulation; when written in this way, it removes all of the humanity from something that is essential to what makes it. Oliver Sacks, a professor of clinical neurology, sees the method where others see madness, and even goes as far as to argue that neurological disorder is not the Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde of the human…

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    The Girl Who Identified Literary Techniques in Dr. Sacks’ Work In order to be an effective science writer, one must clarify their writing and ideas and captivate and convince his or her readers in their articles. Dr. Oliver Sacks’ article “The Man Who Mistook his Wife for a Hat” successfully clarifies, captivates and convinces readers using various literary techniques that are common to both Science writers and English literary writers. Throughout the passage Sacks utilizes simile as a way to…

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