Terry v. Ohio

Sort By:
Decent Essays
Good Essays
Better Essays
Amazing Essays
Best Essays
    Page 1 of 50 - About 500 Essays
  • Good Essays

    Terry V. Ohio Case Study

    • 639 Words
    • 3 Pages

    U.S. 1 (1968) Terry V. Ohio Facts: Police Detective Martin McFadden was an off duty police officer dressed in normal street clothes. On the afternoon of October 31, 1963 McFadden was walking around in downtown Cleveland. While he was out and about two men caught his eye. The men Chilton and Terry were standing on a street corner. McFadden was used to noticing strange and suspicious things and the behavior of these men struck him as suspicious. They were pacing up and down the street peering into the same shops window over and over again. A third man briefly conversed with them and then walked away. The behavior observed by McFadden was characteristic of people casing a joint for a stick up. McFadden was very suspicious after observing this behavior and decided it was time to take action. McFadden approached the three men and identified himself as a police officer, and asked for their names. The men mumbled a response and the officer grabbed…

    • 639 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Amazing Essays

    Cop And Frisk Essay

    • 2178 Words
    • 9 Pages

    If so, he or she may be arrested and searched incident to that arrest."Stop and Frisk." TheFreeDictionary.com. N.p., n.d. Web. 10 Aug. 2016. Investigatory detention became an important law enforcement technique in the 1980s as police sought to curtail the trafficking of illegal drugs. In the United States v. Sokolow, 490 U.S. 1, 109 S. Ct. 1581, 104 L. Ed. 2d 1 (1989), the Supreme Court ruled that the police have the power to detain, question, and investigate suspected drug couriers. The case…

    • 2178 Words
    • 9 Pages
    Amazing Essays
  • Good Essays

    However, Law enforcement officers do not have to have justification to stop someone on a public street to ask questions. Under the Fourth Amendment; individuals are completely entitled to refuse to answer any such questions and go about their business. In some cases, an officer may only search people and places where the officer has probable cause or reasonable suspicion to suspect criminal activity. (Taylor Law Company, 2016) For example, in the case Terry v. Ohio, John W. Terry (petitioner)…

    • 787 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Amazing Essays

    could be heaven or this could be hell.” The policy of Stop and Frisk arose from the decision of United States Supreme Court in the matter of Terry v. Ohio, 392 U.S. 1 (1968). This seminal case gave police the right to stop a person on the street and question them and if they can establish reasonable suspicion that the individual either committed a crime or is about to commit a crime then they can perform a frisk of the individual. Initially this policy gave police a great new tool in the…

    • 1182 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Amazing Essays
  • Decent Essays

    Stop And Frisk Case Study

    • 613 Words
    • 3 Pages

    “reasonable suspicion” meaning that based on their training and experience they should be able to determine if a person is involved in criminal activity. Once the person is stopped, the police will conduct several questions to determine his/her identity and their activities also said as their whereabouts. If the police fears for their safety they move on to the next step, to frisk the person for any weapons or other illegal contrabands. The term “reasonable suspicion” and for a police officer to…

    • 613 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Good Essays

    Crime Perception

    • 1059 Words
    • 5 Pages

    In 1968, the United States Supreme Court case Terry v. Ohio decided that police may stop a person for questioning and frisk, without probable cause, if they have reasonable suspicion that the person has committed or is about to commit a crime. The New York City Liberty Union website provides a total number of how many people were stopped from the year 2002 to 2016, while also providing a racial breakdown of how many of that total were blacks, whites, and Latinos. According to this website, in…

    • 1059 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    St. Paul V. Uber Case

    • 2052 Words
    • 9 Pages

    Analyzing a case, City of St. Paul v. Uber, 450, N.W. 2d 623 (Minn. Ct. App. 1990) an officer who was with the Minnesota Police Department of St. Paul, for eighteen years, had been working the early morning night patrol. While out on patrol, he had witnessed a driver, in a pickup truck at approximately 2:15 a.m. in a particular part of town that was known to be where people would pick up prostitutes. Again the male driver was seen about a half hour later in the same area at 2:45 pm. Officer…

    • 2052 Words
    • 9 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    Constitution, the Fourth Amendment guarantees citizens the right to be free from unreasonable searches and seizures. In Terry v. Ohio, 392 U.S. 1 (1968), the U.S. Supreme Court concluded that a search is reasonable when police observe suspicious behavior and there is reasonable suspicion the individual is armed and dangerous. In Florida v. J.L., 529 U.S. 266 (2000), the Supreme Court held that a Terry stop based only on an anonymous caller giving a physical description and illegal acts of an…

    • 497 Words
    • 2 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Better Essays

    ruled against the NYPD’s stop-and-frisk program condemning it for its overflow of unreasonable stops and searches that is corrupted with indirect racial profiling. c) In 1999, Amadou Diallo a 22-year-old West African immigrant was outside his Bronx apartment, four police officers stopped him because he resembled a rapist in a police sketch. d) As Diallo was reaching for his wallet to identify himself, he was shot to death due to the cops presuming he was reaching for a…

    • 1458 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Better Essays
  • Good Essays

    Initially the Court was in agreement that the stop and subsequent arrest in the Terry case was appropriate on the basis of the “probable cause” standard. Barrett (1998) states, Chief Justice Warren had initially approached this decision on the basis that the stop in the Terry case was appropriate. It was Justice Brennan who eventually persuaded Chief Justice Warren to render a decision which put forth the new “reasonable suspicion” standard (Barrett, 1998, 793-821). If Chief Justice Warren…

    • 1445 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Previous
    Page 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 50