Spiritual Exercises of Ignatius of Loyola

Sort By:
Decent Essays
Good Essays
Better Essays
Amazing Essays
Best Essays
    Page 1 of 2 - About 18 Essays
  • Good Essays

    The active, written, discursive pursuit of the incomprehensible established in Rahner’s writing acts as a form of spirituality. In this way, self-reflexivity grounded in tradition develops as spiritual theology. Evident in Ronald Modras’ Ignatian Humanism: A Dynamic Spirituality for the 21st Century, Patrick Byrne’s “The Passionateness of Being: The Legacy of Bernard Lonergan”, and Bernard Lonergan’s “Method in Theology” and “Healing and Creating in History”, I will focus on how self-reflexivity as cultivated alongside academic theology manifests in a form that heals and creates, rather than one that hates and destroys. Plurality as applied to academic theology functions to educate and mobilize the whole person – body, mind, and spirit. I…

    • 1371 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Better Essays

    St. Ignatius Analysis

    • 2693 Words
    • 11 Pages

    St. Ignatius believes that we can find God in all things, at every moment, even in the most ordinary times. In the First Week of the Exercise there is a section on General Examen (SE p.25-31). The examen leads us into a relationship with a God who desires to be personally caught up in the lives of those whom he created. It is a prayer that focused on God’s presence with us in the real wold. It allows us to reflect what God is saying to us through our daily activities in participating in…

    • 2693 Words
    • 11 Pages
    Better Essays
  • Good Essays

    St. Ignatius of Loyola was born in the family castle in northern Spain on October 23rd 1491. He was the last child of 13 of a wealthy noble family. During his childhood, his stepmother raised him as mother died early and his father had a job as a blacksmith. St. Ignatius of Loyola had a love for war exercises which made him join the army at the age of seventeen as to fight the French. While in the army he went into many battles without once getting injured. His experience in battles made him…

    • 399 Words
    • 2 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    Catholic Church, they came up with reforms such as the foundation of seminaries for priest to have legitimate guidance in their spiritual life and to educate them on the traditions of the Church. Another objective discussed was religious order. Religious Orders at the time benefitted the church in so many ways. These orders put their time into helping the sick and needy in their local communities. Some of these orders include, Capuchins, Ursulines, Theatines, Discalced, Carmelites, Barnabites,…

    • 1181 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    Loyola founded the Jesuits he was a Spanish priest, and a theologian that believed you have to exercise your own spiritually. Through praying, mental working, and focusing in on God which he states. He tells Christian to study, exercise, and look back on their spirituality. Which will help Christians have deeper relations with god. In these two sentences it explains how the exercises took place. “For centuries the Exercises were most commonly given as a “long retreat” of about 30 days in…

    • 1144 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    The order of the Jesuits played a vital part in the Counter-Reformation over time the Jesuits were able to convert millions of individuals to Catholicism. The impact was so great that he was able to convert not only the people around, but around the world as well. This particular movement was founded by Ignatius de Loyola in August 1534. Ignatius de Loyola was a Spanish soldier who decided to turn into a priest. In the first set of the Jesuits there were six students and Ignatius, who decided to…

    • 963 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    found that curious, young university students might support their same vision. The action of open “recruiting” had been effective and soon Ignatius’s group was organized into ten members. By 1539, these members under Ignatius’s lead had organized numerous assemblies aimed at constructing the framework of an organized religious group. The groups collaboration eventually yielded the “Five Chapters,” which would later finally become Formula of the Institute. Upon completion of this draft, Ignatius…

    • 1889 Words
    • 8 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    and spreading the good news of Jesus Christ. Missionaries, such as Francis Xavier and Ignatius of Loyola, performed apostolic service by spreading the good news. They flawlessly portray and live out the true meaning of being a Christian disciple and I wish to follow them. There are several ways we have learned about Christian…

    • 1003 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Better Essays

    Ignatius Of Loyola Essay

    • 1735 Words
    • 7 Pages

    Throughout history there has been many important individuals who have made an impact on our society, and influenced Christians around the world. Ignatius of Loyola was a man who made significant contributions by developing a systematic program for “The conquest of self, and the regulation of one’s life,” for service to the Catholic Church (Spielvogel, 281). He was gravely wounded while serving in the Spanish military fighting against the French. While slowly recuperating, Ignatius of Loyola…

    • 1735 Words
    • 7 Pages
    Better Essays
  • Good Essays

    Ignatian Spirituality

    • 1326 Words
    • 6 Pages

    The spirituality, he developed, places great emphasis on prayer, meditation and self-awareness. The Spiritual Exercises of Ignatius of Loyola is the foundation of Ignatian Spirituality. The intent of The Spiritual Exercises is to discern the will of God in the retreatant’s life. Ignatian Spirituality stresses God’s presence in the ordinary activities of daily life, in our work, in our family, in our friends, in our sorrows, in our joys. It sees God always at work, inviting us to a deeper…

    • 1326 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Previous
    Page 1 2