Silas Weir Mitchell

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    Kate Chopin's allegory 'Story of an Hour' captures the social restraints imposed upon women in the late 19th century, detailing the struggle for female independence and freedom. Utilizing both direct and indirect characterization, Chopin's short story contains themes of societal repression of women, emancipation from the patriarchy and the pursuit of liberty, and the perils of marriage and monogamy. Chopin's use of a myriad of literary techniques such as imagery and repetition highlight the…

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    and writer. She had views that middle class women were enslaved by “masculisnist” ideas of domesticity. (Perkins, 64) After experiencing what could be described today as post partum depression, she sought the help of a prominent doctor named S. Weir Mitchell. His treatment was the norm for those days, which called for no intellectual stimulation, lots of food, and complete rest (Perkins, 62). With that treatment it was no surprise that a woman such as herself was driven to near madness. The…

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    Freedom of thought hasn't always been accessible for women. In the 19th century women were belittled and restricted from expressing their thoughts and feelings. And when a woman did express any form of emotion other than obedience, she was labeled as insane. Ernest Hemingway gave a reporter a perfect response of sexism over a friend's breakup, ¨But why couldn’t he have told her to go to hell? Because she was sick. It’s being sick makes them act so bloody awful usually and it’s because they’re…

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    She is the inner sorrow of Savitri’s mind. Savitri goes beyond, to reach and listen to her mind and in the real world of sorrow. Savitri is in her way towards a complete transformation. She is in her inner suffering that leads her towards the mental change of her psychic soul. As she recounts her the various forms in which she works is not only the way she leads her life but she is the ordinary mind of human suffering; an ordinary lady of the world with full of sorrow and pain. Also the Mother…

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    Writing often reflects an author’s own experiences. In her short story, “The Yellow Wallpaper,” Charlotte Perkins Gilman does this by showing the shortcomings of Dr. Silas Weir Mitchell’s rest treatment through Jane, the narrator of the story. She reveals how this treatment leads to mental deterioration and eventual insanity. Gilman further reinforces this idea through her response to her short story, titled “Why I Wrote ‘The Yellow Wallpaper,’” which gives evidence that Gilman uses the narrator…

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    QUESTIONING CREDIBILITY Dianne Rockenstein, who received her Bachelor's degree in psychology and Master's degree in counseling psychology, wrote a public review discussing Daphne Scholinski's memoir The Last Time I Wore a Dress. With her review on the memoir, she mentions Scholinski consistent behavior of wanting to stretch the truth, wanting to be in control, and exemplifying bad behavior (Rockenstein, 1). She further highlights the other issues that surrounded Daphne being committed to a…

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    “A Tunnel to Call Home” Answers: Makenna’s Questions The title “A Tunnel to Call home” gives the reader a glimpse into what they are about to read: an essay about someone that lives in a tunnel. The title’s correlation to the passage as a whole reflects the predicament within the article. Many are troubled, especially Virginia’s family, by the idea of a women sleeping and living in a metro station on a cardboard box. Although the title reveals that the tunnel is seen as a home, meaning Virginia…

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    ABNORMAL PSYCHOLOGY CIA I CASE STUDY: THE GENAIN QUADRUPLETS Sneha Ganguly- 1313249 Keerthana Ullas- 1313231 Hitha Maureen- 1313228 Sneha Elizabeth- 1313249 THE CASE STUDY The Genain quadruplets (born in 1930) are a set of identical quadruplet sisters. All four of them developed schizophrenia, suggesting a major genetic factor to the cause of the disease. The pseudonym Genain, used to protect the identity of the family, comes from the Greek, meaning dire birth. The sisters were given the…

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    Susannah Cahalan’s memoir, Brain On Fire, conveys her journey and struggle through a detrimental disease, in which she loses significant aspects of her core identity. The memoir exemplifies the theme that loss of identity yields self discovery, concentrating primarily on how her experiences shaped the progression of her life before and after her disease. When creating the found poem, I wanted to focus the ideas around Susannah’s struggle for her identity. I utilized repetition with the phrase,…

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    Diagnosis Of Lady Macbeth

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    Diagnose of lady Macbeth I diagnose lady Macbeth with post-traumatic stress disorder because of the symptoms that I found that describe her and the way she acts. Lady Macbeth show trouble concentrating because of the way she acts and in the movie look like she was scared and shaking. Lady Macbeth be feeling overwhelm because she acts like she doesn’t what she be doing. Then when lady Macbeth was trying to scrub off the blood from her hands and to take away the evidence. When lady Macbeth was…

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