Sikh

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    Exploring A Sikh

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    than mosques for two main reasons. First, I grew up in an Islamic country where building houses of worship other than mosques is not allowed for religious reasons. Second, I chose to go to a Sikh temple because in my community, there is a common stereotype that Sikhs do not get along with Muslims. Growing up with this idea, made me presume that there are barriers between us, so I can not get closer to that culture. Culture description: India is one of the most religiously and ethnically diverse countries in the world; therefore, I strongly believe that its inefficient to ignore any of these various cultures and generalize one culture…

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    Sikh In America Essay

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    It is very unfortunate that these Individuals that practice Sikhism fled from India because violence and discrimination they faced there and now because of the horrible acts of others that were not Sikhs, they have to endure discrimination in the land of the free also. Also because in this country the majority are Christians and because of the past conflict with Individuals that are from the middle east or that look middle easterners, certain Americans believe people they should not be allowed…

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    Cynthia Keppley Mahamood examines some of the problems Sikhs are facing regarding their “identity and commitment”. She looks at the overall question of “Who is a Sikh”. In particular Mahamood explores Canada, and how it has responded to the influx of Sikh immigrants. He analyzes and shares examples of discrimination against Sikhs face in Canada. Also, how the current Indo-Canadian society has chosen to follow certain societal and cultural norms, which go against the Gurus teachings. Within the…

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    Punjabi Sikhs were the first South Asians to move to North America. As far back as 1670, a Sikh was mentioned in the diary of a Colonist, as having been encountered in the company of a sea captain. They were a curiosity as South Asian migration had yet to occur. In 1903, a small trickle of Punjabis arrived in North America through Canada and half traveled onto the United States. Of them, the majority were illiterate or semi-literate from farming or military backgrounds. They left minimal…

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    'The Turban Is Not A HAT'

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    From Kaur’s historical outline about Sikh organizations, most Sikh organizations currently are fighting to promote rights for Sikhs. Puar (2008), in her article called THE TURBAN IS NOT A HAT’: QUEER DIASPORA AND PRACTICES OF PROFILING describes how after the attacks of 9-11, the notions of masculinity and identity towards turbans had been attacked by the mainstream culture. Puar theorizes how Sikhs were mistakenly given the title of terrorist, which led to attacks against turbaned men. Sikhs…

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    Physicians, nurses, chaplains, and others who come in contact with patients should have a wide range on the knowledge on how to care for people of a different faith. Sikh and Christians have some similarities and differences when it comes to health care. Sikh receive or accept medical treatment just like Christians. They believe in extended family, just as Christians do. If any sensitive matter is going to be discussed in the presence of the family, the patient should be asked. Christianity…

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    Harvel Dbq Asian Americans

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    Sikh Asian Americans Asian-Americans are fastest growing racial group in America today. After 1965, American immigration laws were adjusted to allow people from Asian to enter the US and reside in the US as permanent residents in larger numbers. The motivation behind the construction of these new laws involved the desire of the US to build its economy from taking some of the brightest minds in other nations and incorporating them into its own. Thanks to the US not wanting to separate families…

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    also known as the Sikh temple. Ever since my brother and I were children, our parents instilled a weekly routine of attending our local temple every Sunday afternoon. Although some children might say it was boring to sit for ninety minutes listening to hymns, and sermons, I enjoyed going to the Gurdwara. After the sermons, we ate langar, which was a free meal welcome to all, where I was able to eat great food, socialize with my friends, and do seva. Seva is a central theme of Sikhism, and was…

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    Indira Gandhi Influence

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    Minister, the Sikh population in Punjab demanded a separate Sikh religious nation. Indira Gandhi negotiated a compromise so that the official language in Punjab became Punjabi, but Punjab remained a part of India. This appeased the Sikhs because they felt more connected to their religion and culture, and the government was pleased because India remained a unified nation. (Dommermuth-Costa 91). Because of such skilled political maneuvers, Mrs. Gandhi became so universally popular that after her…

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    Research Paper On Sikhism

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    Sikhism. Established in the fifteenth century in the Punjab region of India, Sikhism holds the principle that all people are children of God, regardless of caste, status, or history. The founder of Sikhism, Guru Nanak Dev, aimed to use Sikhism to emphasize “a casteless society in which there will be mutual coexistence and cooperation” (Singh, 2008, p. 35) and defined Sikh to mean “disciple” (Singh, 2008). Sikhs believe in the formless concept of God and suggest that the best way to salvation is…

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