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    Yanomami Tribe

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    Suzi Tomlinson Mr. Carver Comp. Many years ago tribes of the jungle lived in peace, untouched by the outside world. They led a simple life: no gadgets or crazy mechanical contraptions. They hunted with simply a strong stick and a sharp pointed rock at the end, or they would throw stones at their prey in hopes of killing it. Their clothing was what they could make out of the resources that they had, if any. Their beds were the unforgiving jungle floor. Many of the tribes had never seen any other people outside of the area that they live and hunt in, and without a doubt have never seen a man with white skin before. Living in total isolation for decades, a life revolving around survival, and fear of the unknown outside world, the lost tribes should be protected from the dangers they could face. For some their whole life is about to change due to outside influences. The fact that these tribes have lived for so long without any help or need for the outside world is remarkable. They continue their primitive lifestyles. As the modern world grows, the amount of greedy people continues to climb. These people would do anything to get what they desire even if it means killing off a whole tribe. Illegal miners, ranchers, loggers, and hunters are the huge threats that our beloved lost tribes face today. The illegal miners mainly work in South America. As they work a high amount of mercury escapes the sites, running off into the river the tribe's main source of water. When this happens…

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    When discussing human nature, anthropologists don’t One popular controversy within the anthropological community is based on the Yanomami indians. The Yanomami, or Yanomamo, are the largest “relatively isolated tribe” in South America; located in large, mountainous areas of northern Brazil and southern Venezuela in the Amazon jungle. Their current population stands at about thirty-five thousand, all of which are concentrated in several different parts of the South American jungle. Many…

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    The cause of child rearing in the 20th century Yanomami is social structure and aggression. The Yanomami believe their children to be very precious and are more vulnerable and susceptible to be stolen and supernatural perils, consequently they require a great deal of protection both physically and spiritually (Salamone 1997, 41). This essay will look at the level to which aggression is reflected in to child rearing in Yanomami tribes in the 20th century. This essay will further explore the…

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    Yanomami Essay

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    The Yanomami live in the tropical rain forest of southern Venezuela and northern Brazil in the Amazon River region. They are believed to have migrated from Asia across the Bering Straits, which thousands of years ago was a land bridge that connected Asia to North America. They slowly made their way down North America into South America. The Yanomami are probably some of the first immigrants to South America. It is thought they arrived in South America around 12,000 years ago. They are often…

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    Rain Forest

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    Rebeca Lambarria Steve Nehlsen Cultural Anthropology Spirit of the Rain Forest In the book "Spirit of the Rain Forest," Mark Andrew Ritchie relates the story of a Venezuelan Shaman named Jungleman, and his people. Although the author is Mark Andrew Ritchie, the story is told by Jungleman. Jungleman affirms that many of the stories he is telling came to him via the spirit world. When Jungleman was a young boy, he says that the spirits came to him but at first he was really afraid of them.…

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    that their tribes that they went to, Lewis gave a medal to one of the Indians which proves his respect to their tribe. Like in Document B where it says that “One of the Indians, the fellow to whom I had given the medal last evening, slipped behind J. Fields and took his gun and his brother’s gun.” which just explains the situation on how Lewis and Clark were being supportive and caring to the Indians. This quote says that while Lewis and Clark were exploring their land, for their appreciation to…

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    due to her ability to identify landmarks and for interpretation. Sacagawea, meaning “Bird Woman,” recognized important geographical features on the way to find Shoshoni camps, but for the most part of the journey, she was identifying territory that was as new to her as it was to the captains. Success for the expedition lay with communication/translation, and Sacagawea most important role was that of translator. She often worked as a part of a “long cumbersome translation chain that took each…

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