Scottish Renaissance

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    Lewis Grassic Gibbon was the pseudonym of James Leslie Mitchell (1901-1935). Born of peasant ancestry, Gibbon was an active socialist and writer at work during the Scottish Renaissance of the early to mid twentieth century alongside such contemporaries as Neil M. Gunn (1891-1973) and Hugh MacDiarmid (1892-1978). The author 's careful employment of stream-of-consciousness technique, the Scots idiom and social realism have marked this particular text out as one of the most innovative and defining works of the period. Furthermore, it could be argued that the novel has become one of the most important books in the history of Scottish literature. Subsequently, Sunset Song (1932) is now one of the most popular Scottish novels of all time. In addition to this, we know from Gibbon 's response to the Writers ' International statement (1934) cited in Johnson (2005, p.117), which proposed that Britain 's economy and culture were in a state of 'terminal decay ', that the author considered all of his work to be…

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    Community Education

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    In community education there is also often a responsibility with working with poor or disadvantaged communities and this stems from the mid 1900s when reforms began in relation to health, housing and government and people responding to and supporting the voice of the poor admist these reforms. In Part 1 of the Scottish Executive Guidance for Community Learning and Development there is a section which reads ‘In many parts of Scotland poverty and disadvantage are concentrated in particular…

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    parliament, nor can they assemble binding legislation of their own. No Parliament can bind a future parliament meaning that the current parliament cannot create a law that a future parliament would be unable to edit. In its simplest terms parliament is the highest legal authority, however parliament is not the highest decision making body that is the government. Also, parliament is not the most powerful body as that responsibility lies with the people of the UK. As the years have gone by,…

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    In 1707, The Act of Union forged the nation of Great Britain. This joined the English and Scottish Parliaments into the British Parliament centered in London. The Union promised Scots unhindered access to English markets and colonies. The possibility of economic benefit through trade was a significant pro-union sentiment, expressed best by a Commissioner of Scottish Parliament: This nation is behind all other nations of Europe, for many years, with respect to the effects of an extended trade.…

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    Elements Of Scots Law

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    is the primary source of Scots law and it is decided and approved by the parliamentary will. There are three sources of legislation binding in Scots law: - European legislation - UK legislation - Scottish legislation The law-making power of the…

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    Role Of Evil In Macbeth

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    ‘Macbeth and Lady Macbeth commit monstrous acts, but they are not monsters. Discuss.’ ‘Fate’ and ‘Ambition’ are the two keys components that drive the play Macbeth forward. In terms of plot and characterization, the two powerful characters Macbeth and Lady Macbeth take fate into their hands to reach towards their goals which lead to a series of misfortunes and sins which turns them from an ambitious person into a monster. The play starts with the three witches quoting, ‘Fair is foul, and foul…

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    During the Renaissance period, England went through many transformations that affected the country in different ways. The previous era called the Middle Ages was still present in the lives of people, but its values were gradually changing into those of the Renaissance. This term comes from the French word renaissance which means rebirth. The human being as a species was reborn and had the opportunity to fully develop its potential, creativity, and curiosity by being more aware of itself and of…

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    This essay will examine the different reforms established by New Labour and any impact they have had on British politics. New Labour enacted multiple reforms in its term from 1997-2007, from introducing independence to the Bank of England (1998) to The Human Rights Act 1998. Devolution seems to be the biggest element of the reform programme that made the most significant change to British politics. Many of the reforms have had some impact but none to the scale that devolution has. One of the…

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    Edmund Morgan, an American historian and a previous history professor at Yale University, unveils how slavery was able to exist in America while liberty was held at the highest of standards in his journal Slavery and Freedom: The American Paradox. After sifting through the stories of our nations founding fathers and most important men of the American Revolution his discovers that, unlike most other historians, the fopaux we call slavery did not begin as a racist act. Morgan also discovered that…

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    L01 Increasingly in recent times there have been questions raised as to whether the interests of the Scottish people would be better served closer to home. Some have argued for greater legislative powers to be transferred to Holyrood, whilst others instead see separation from the Union as being the key to meeting the needs of the people. This essay will examine these issues and more surrounding the governance of Scotland. When looking at what events were pivotal on the road to Scottish…

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