Relational dialectics

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    Using Genderlect Styles and Relational Dialectics to Examine Communication Problems in Marriages Scholar C. Kenemore Winona State University Examining Communication Problems in Marriages using Genderlect Styles and Relational Dialectics. Introduction “Till death do us part” isn’t really the case anymore. In the United States alone, researchers predict that 40-50% of couples getting married will get divorced, and 60% of 2nd marriages will get divorced (Gottman). The average marriage is also only seven years long. These statistics can be alarming and very scary to anyone who plans on having their “happily ever after” someday. When researching why couples get divorced, many state that they grew apart or how their spouse hid psychological problems. These are valid reasons, but the most common reason found was several months of arguing and disappointments. This leads to the ability to communicate with their significant other to deteriorate. Communication is key when it comes to any kind of relationship. The relational dialectics theory and genderlect styles will be used to explain why communication problems occur in marriages and how to avoid these issues. Starting off, this…

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    It is unlikely for a relationship to exist in the absence of communication. Without this connection, individuals cannot share ideas. All interactions will be useless. While attraction leads to fondness, it is how people interact that glues them together. So, although means and forms and communication differ, the principles are constant. An understanding of communication theories can place one at a vantage position. Of importance are two theories: Relational Dialectics Theory and Genderlect Style…

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    The definition of Relational Dialectics Theory describes how relational life is described as an ongoing tension between contradictory impulses (199). However, the theory can benefit from economic terms as presented in Social Exchange Theory. Moreover, the theory could develop and explain how cost and rewards affect a relationship based on ongoing tensions. The two theories have similarities staring with their assumptions of rational life. Consequently, Relational Dialectics can use an…

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    The relational dialectics theory (RDT) can be best understood as all the ups and downs people face in relationships and how they are resolved. RDT consist of three major parts, autonomy vs. connectedness, novelty vs. predictability, and openness and closedness. RDT is commonly handled by four methods, selection, separation, neutralization, and reframing. The relational dialectics theory generally, "involve experiencing tensions based on contradictory needs" (Wahl, A. Edwards, Myers & C.…

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    Relational Dialecticics

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    The stability and satisfaction of relationships is a major problem that has been, and is continually being researched. Relational dialectics takes a look at what communication in relationships looks like. The two leading researchers in this field are Baxter and Montgomery. They are also the same researchers who proposed the theory in 1988. Their definition of this field of study is, “The both/and quality that leads us to contradiction between us and our relationship partner”(Wood, 2000, p.132).…

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    Coming into college I knew I was going to meet new and different people compared to me. Dialectical tension occurs in every relationship. My roommate and I get along, but bringing friends to our room can be very embarrassing. The guy just does not know how keep his side tidy enough to at least be presentable. He has clothes scattered everywhere, food on his desk that would remind you of a garbage can, and his floor looks like somebody painted a picture on it, then messed up so the artist just…

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    There is famous research on the subject of dialectical tensions; Baxter and Montgomery (1996) in their book “Relating Dialogues and Dialectics” asserted there are three different dialectical tensions, and six different parts; the first is “Autonomy vs Connectedness”, or the need between independence and connection. The second dialectical tension is “Novelty vs Predictability (or spontaneity)”, or the need between wanting new, fresh things vs. the familiar. The third and final dialectical tension…

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    Autonomy leads to dialectic tension with the desire for connectedness with a significant other, the state of closeness and intimacy we share with another person. When you become extremely close to someone you begin to form a singular identity. As the authors of Elasticity and the Dialectic Tensions of Organizational Identity would put it, how we deal with dialectic tensions is a matter of if we expand our individual identities in a relationship or constrict them. I have seen relationships…

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    The targeted questions purpose were to find the foundation of the relationship by using relationship theories such as Knapp’s Theory, Johari’s Window, Social Penetration Theory, and Dialectic Theory. The religious background was examined as well as their common interests. Despite the relationship being no more profound than their religious beliefs it has demonstrated to be a solid, healthy relationship. The participants were my parents, Martin and Chamine McDowell. The methods I used were…

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    exclusively are forcibly prevented from doing so, cities will have no rest from evils” (473c-d). In short, Philosophers would be the ideal rulers because they rule for the common interest unlike the rulers of the current, corrupt city. To better understand why Socrates believes philosophers should rule a city, I must first define what it is to be a true philosopher. Socrates acknowledges that the philosophers of modern day are not suited to be philosopher kings, admitting they are useless or…

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