Proprioception

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    Proprioception In Rehab

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    Proprioception is often overlooked in the rehabilitation or rehab process. However, it is vitally important in order to restore normal function to an injured body part. Since proprioception is a person’s ability to coordinate movements and determine how much effort is needed in order to move something, it is critical to practice these types of movements in rehab before returning the patient to activities. Once an injury occurs, the body will protect itself and begin to shut down in certain aspects. This can cause a patient’s proprioception to fail because the body is more worried about controlling and resolving the injury instead of controlling the extremity as a whole. Weak proprioception can be detrimental when a patient begins functional…

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    Proprioception is often overlooked in the rehabilitation or rehab process. However, it is vitally important in order to restore normal function to an injured body part. Since proprioception is a person’s ability to tell where they are in space and how much effort is needed in order to move something, it is important to practice these types of movements in rehab before returning the patient to activities. Once an injury occurs, the body will protect itself and begin to shut down in certain…

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    Cerebrovascular Accidents

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    The purpose of this literature review paper is to analyze the use of proprioception training in individuals who have suffered a cerebrovascular accident, most commonly referred to as a stroke. As defined in the textbook (Coker, 2013), proprioception is “the continuous flow of sensory information received from receptors located in the muscles, tendons, joints, and inner ear regarding movement and body position.” A stroke can affect various areas of the brain, including those involved in balance…

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    The Willows Film Analysis

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    On their journey down the Danube River, they enter an isolated area that they come to believe is possessed. With explanations being that their boat is scratched, their paddle is missing, there are holes in the sand to name a few, the two men become increasingly concerned about their chances of surviving this trip, let alone a night on this island. Although they have physical “evidence” of some being other than themselves being on the island, neither of them ever come into contact with a…

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    imbalance, (2) tendency to push strongly toward the paretic side with the non-affected limbs, and (3) resistance to external correction of the tilted posture.5 Pusher behavior was found to last an average of 5 weeks after the onset of the CVA.6 There is debate about the prevalence of PB due to the lack of standardization for diagnosing the condition.5 Pusher behavior is linked with a CVA insult to the posterior thalamus. This area of the brain appears to be associated with the control of…

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    Around eight o’clock one October night, my life was changed forever. A senior in high school, I was leaving the county fair, after having spent the evening with friends and family, enjoying one of the many “lasts” of my high school experience. I was stopped at a red light in front of my best friend when suddenly all I saw was white light and all I could hear was the screeching of tires and my own loud screaming. The bright, flashing lights of emergency vehicles and the feeling of being jerked…

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    Short Story Journal - “Choices” by Susan Kerslake Every professional and amateur writer tends to use imagery to paint a picture, to connect the five senses with the story. The majority of the time it is employ to evoke emotion, mood. Authors utilize imagery to get people involved in the story, and to acquire them to reflect. It makes the reader visualized a vivid picture of what the writer is trying to convey. The majority of the people tend to relate as well as to obtain familiarity with the…

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    What makes a person blind? The state of being blind can be both physical and emotional. Physically you can literally be blind and not have the ability to see anything around you. Emotionally you can be blind in the sense of ignorance and love. There is some what of an old saying that love is blind; I believe that love can be blind. Being blind to love is in the state of which you are in love but don’t even know it. It’s like being an amazing singer and not even noticing it. Not noticing until…

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    Often we ask one another, “What do you mean?” in an effort to understand something more clearly, whether it be a comment, joke, language, even a word, or in many cases objects, encounters, experiences, and sometimes other people, that are difficult to understand. All together creating meaning helps with understanding and making meaning of one another. On the other hand, language also has meaning; It has meaning that is attached to by the application of a certain group or culture. Most…

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    epidural, had a reduced occurrence of phantom limb pain in the first year following their amputation. The theory behind using somatic nerve blocks or the usage of the lumbar epidural was to interrupt the nociceptive input. It also may have the ability to block the sympathetic fibres that run with the somatic nerves , meaning that it will eliminate or reduce sympathetic overactivity, (Bach, S. 1988). One treatment option is the use of a mirror box, where the amputee is made to look at their…

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