Primary auditory cortex

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    While these disorders may never fully be understood, advances are still being made in this realm of disorders. In the coming years, it is to be expected that more genetic related studies will help us understand the nature versus nurture link. We may also see more gene regulating developmental process in prefrontal cortex as well as in other brain areas (Xiao et al., 2014). Animal models will also be crucial in this research so that we can easily see the development of certain types of mutations and how they present (Xiao et al.,…

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    PET Disadvantages

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    Others have argued that there is a distinction between subvocalization (our inner voice) and the phonological store (our inner ear). In this view, subvocalization is more of a motor plan, whereas the phonological store is a short term acoustic memory. The idea is that these two compo- nents are tightly linked and work together during auditory imagery. Based on the neu- roimaging data we have seen so far, it’s tempting to speculate that the SMA could be involved with subvocalization, whereas…

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    Childhood Trauma

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    functioning in everyday life. “Alterations in gray matter development represent a potential pathway through which childhood abuse is associated with psychopathology.” De Bellis, (2013). MRI scans of adolescents who have experienced physical and or sexual abuse show reduced cortical thickness and reduced gray matter volume in subcortical regions. Specific regions affected include the prefrontal cortex, parahippocampal gyrus, and the temporal…

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    Stroke Neuroplasticity

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    Factors contributing to motor recovery include neuroplasticity, response to focal injury, and strategies for adaptive responses. Neuroplasticity is a concept that suggests a given function in the brain can transfer to another area of the brain if damage has occurred. The brain reorganizes itself by forming new synaptic connections, or neural pathways, through the process of repetitive learning. After a focal brain injury, the degree of damage to the corticospinal tract correlates to the…

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    Essay On 5 Senses

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    All five of our different senses are important to have for a variety of reasons. They allow us to see, to feel, to hear, to smell, and to taste. There are also a lot of different parts of the body that allow us to experience these senses. If I had to choose which sense to lose though, I would choose to lose my sense of taste. One of our five senses is taste. The primary function of taste is to have us evaluate what we are eating. There are a few different areas that give us the ability to…

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    Neuroanatomy Assignment

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    [2] The main function of the thalamus is relaying and integrating information to and from the cerebral cortex using the many nuclei that lie within it. [10] Another vital role of the thalamus is to maintain consciousness of the animal. [11] This would account for the reduced mental status of the Labrador in this case, as the fleshy matter was located here. The lateral geniculate nuclei (LGN) are ‘olive’ like in shape and are found either side in the posterior thalamus. They receive input via…

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    Five Special Senses

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    excited by any type of tissue damage. 3. Referred pain is a phenomenon when you feel pain in an area other than where the pain originates from. 4. The thalamus and cerebral cortex are the parts on the brain that interpret pain impulses. The thalamus establishes the awareness of pain, and the cerebral cortex verifies the severity of the pain, discovers where the pain is coming from, and responds to the pain. Five Special Senses 1. Sense of Smell The olfactory organs of the nose are linked…

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    Sensory Analysis

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    while other is less accurate about estimating the location. Altogether multiple channels provide better accuracy of perception. It was long time ago that multi-sensory stimuli provided faster reaction compare to unisensory (Hershenson, 1962). Timing of an event in our perception is mostly driven by audition in such a way that, for instance, rate of the auditory stimuli, flutters, affects the perceived rate of visual flickers more than flickers affect perceived rate of flutters (Gebhard &…

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    1. The pinna or auricle directs sound waves into the auditory canal. The eardrum vibrates according to frequency. Vibration transmitted to malleus then incus and then stapes of the middle ear. When the stapes vibrate, the membrane of the oval window is pushed in and out. This created the fluid pressure in the perilymph. Pressure waves enter the Scala vestibule then Scala tympani and then round window. This is where the walls become deformed in Scala vestibule and Scala tympani. Pressure…

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    The Harmony Project

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    Dr. Nina Kraus, a group of neuroscientists in the Auditory Neuroscience Laboratory (that call themselves “brainvolts”) at Northwestern University have dived into this field. They showed that musicians have stronger auditory cognitive…

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