Porfirio Díaz

Sort By:
Decent Essays
Good Essays
Better Essays
Amazing Essays
Best Essays
    Page 1 of 2 - About 12 Essays
  • Better Essays

    Mexican Culture Essay

    • 1332 Words
    • 5 Pages

    given time and in any given area, we can use lyrics, pictures, and prose to ascertain the state of affairs and how the common people as well as the government felt about it. The Mexican Revolution, lasting from 1910 to 1940, inspired a plethora of historically significant, meaningful traditions, all colored with anti-colonial, autonomous attitudes. During and following this period of revolution, Mexican art, music, and literature responded to the turmoil and violence by attempting to formulate a unique national identity by which all Mexicans could be unified. The Mexican Revolution was a time of great turmoil and ongoing violence between the lower working class who fought for “tierra y libertad (land and freedom)”, and the supporters of Porfirio Diaz, a dictator who had held power for over 30 years. As evidenced in the many vignettes in Nellie Campobello’s Cartucho and My Mother’s Hands, such disturbing acts of violence were very commonplace in this era. An example of this is the narrative of a Villista named Catarino Acosta, whose enemy cut off his ears, put them on a string, and tied them around his neck as he was “paraded through the streets of Parral” on the back of a mule (pg. 17). Eventually, Acosta was forced to run without shoes until he died from exhaustion. Practices such as this these were almost never opposed by the law, and therefore were allowed to continue with little to no consequences. In addition to Cartucho’s accounts of her distressing childhood, violent…

    • 1332 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Better Essays
  • Good Essays

    The Wind That Swept Mexico, by Anita Brenner, is a very intriguing piece that draws attention to the reader through it’s clear description of the revolution and what occurred after it was over. Originally published in 1943 by the Texas Press, Brenner’s piece was known as one of the first to present many different phases of the revolution. Brenner was born in Mexico and lived there for many years. She used to write dispatches for Spain during the Spanish Civil War and edit “Mexico This Month’s”…

    • 1136 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Better Essays

    The Faceless Man and the Golden Mongoose Author, Junot Diaz, starts off his novel, The Brief Wondrous Life of Oscar Wao, with the explanation of fukú, a key element in his work. Diaz’s way of symbolization through mystical characters to be very unique. Fukú, to be a form of “bad luck,” tends to “travel” with us throughout the storyline. Further into the story we come to understand the influence fukú has on the development of Diaz’s characters. It shapes the fear and cautious behaviors of…

    • 1295 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Better Essays
  • Good Essays

    This Way, That Way, Wrong Way, Tea Party… What? I felt like Alice trying to find her way around in Wonderland every time I had to write an essay. Teachers always gave us very broad and generic topics, and every time I was left clueless as to what to write. There were so many possibilities and many directions to go, I felt like Alice trying to follow the signs. Every time I asked my teacher to explain the topic more to me, I felt like I was speaking to Cheshire Cat, and that didn’t help. I would…

    • 892 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    The author I decided to investigate further was Junot Diaz. Junot Diaz is an interesting author, who I feel like writes about the daily lives of Dominicans, that not only Dominicans can relate to, but people of other ethnicities. Diaz’s work interests me mostly because of the way he tells it. I feel that his stories could be happening all around you, which uniquely goes to show the life like feel his works have in which it envelopes the reader into a scenario where they can place themselves…

    • 981 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    live on that land. Caciquismo, a system were caciques own the land and as a result the townspeople, is a major part of Mexico’s early history. The character of Pedro Páramo illustrates the power that those early caciques had over the people who lived on their land. Additionally, there are many parallels between Pedro and Porfirio Diaz, the president during the Mexican revolution, in the way that they use their power. With all the power that these men had, corruption began to prosper throughout…

    • 1345 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    The Mexican Revolution had a less radical conclusion than the Russian Revolution even though both had radical combatants advocating dramatic social change and land reform in the name of greater equality. The Russian revolution, in 1917, succeeded because of the time period which happened, the location, and the discipline of Lenin’s army. On the contrary, the Mexican revolution did not have such a radical effect because of its location, the distance between the two revolutionary groups, and the…

    • 501 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Better Essays

    utmost importance is to contribute to the understanding of the reinterpretation on the 35 year regime of Porfirio Diaz (1876-1911), highlighting the major achievements increasing the Mexican economy, and the fall of the thirty-five year regime. Despite the previous interpretation of Porfirio Diaz regime as an enigma, his government considered as a dictatorship, and inflicting injustice all around the country. It has been said that it is better to regret an action or situation than for it to…

    • 1000 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Better Essays
  • Good Essays

    Porfirio Diaz and the Mexican Revolution Porfirio Diaz was Mexico's longest reigning leader, having led the country for over 35 years. Some considered Diaz to be a ruthless tyrant, while some accredit him with saving Mexico from complete financial destruction. His terms were controversial, but under Porfirio Diaz, Mexico's economy flourished, infrastructure was being created and debt was being paid, but the social strife which occurred under his rule ultimately resulted in the Mexican…

    • 974 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Amazing Essays

    Fact: The most expensive fuel purchased during the trip cost $71.52 per gallon. That includes the price of chartering a Piper Cheyenne III aircraft to act as a fuel truck, Startled by the sunlight flooding my room, I woke up still in Los Mochis, but anxious to embark on our adventures of the day. The next stop was Mazatlan, situated on the Pacific Coast of Mexico, across from the southernmost tip of the Baja California Peninsula. Miguel and I were only planning to stay there long…

    • 1190 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Amazing Essays
  • Previous
    Page 1 2