Platte River

    Page 2 of 48 - About 477 Essays
  • Fieldtrip Report: Wetlands And Flooding

    When Stanwood was built, as mentioned before, where wetlands use to be, causing many problems to the local river. The Stilly river is a long and winding river, however, when the wetlands were destroyed it became overwhelmed by the excess water. The Stilly wraps around a small island in Stanwood, called Florence island. When the river would start to flood, all of Florence island become flooded, destroying businesses and homes. People of Stanwood started to look for a solution…

    Words: 1243 - Pages: 5
  • A Comparison Of The Movie, Vicki Tikki Tavi '

    Bravery, courageous behavior or character is the very definition of a certain mongoose, Rikki-tikki-tavi. The movie by Julie Ross, and the book written by Rudyard Kipling, altho similar have certain differences. In the movie and the book Rikki Tikki Tavi is washed out of his home during a flood. He is found by a family and warmed up. Rikki Tikki Tavi soon learns of the two formidable king cobras in the garden. The movie and the book have similarities between the characters, the setting, and the…

    Words: 749 - Pages: 3
  • The Hatchet By Gary Paulsen Summary

    A 42-year-old woman from Alberta named Rhonda Cardinal was lost in Northern Alberta's wilderness after blacking out on a rabbit trapping trip in 2012. She was living off berries and river water. She couldn't explain how she went missing. She "blacked out", woke up lost and started wandering around through a bush. When she was lost, she encountered a bear. She survived for 16 days. The "Hatchet" by Gary Paulsen is about a fourteen year old boy named Brian Robinson who's traveling to Canada to…

    Words: 724 - Pages: 3
  • Riparian Zone Case Study

    1. a) Roles of the riparian zone include filtering and buffering water through the various vegetation, acting as flood protection areas, trapping sediment and preventing erosion (though the roots of riparian plants) before they reach the water course, helping maintain local water table levels, shading by the riparian plants and keeping stream temperatures low during the summer for the fish, acting as a corridor for land mammals (e.g. bears, deer, squirrels), and overall maintaining biological…

    Words: 938 - Pages: 4
  • Effects Of Hydraulics On Fish Fauna

    1. Effect of obstructing hydraulic structures on the fish fauna: Dams, barrages, weirs or navigation locks built on a river for various purposes act as obstruction to the migration of the fishes. Various effects of such hydraulic structures are as follows: a) Barrier to the movement of fish to their spawning grounds. Several fish species require special regions to spawn. These hydraulic structures obstruct the movement of such species to their upstream spawning grounds where they reproduce. As…

    Words: 1542 - Pages: 7
  • River Continuum Concepts

    stream. However, this is a dangerous misconception that is not at all correct. The truth is that streams and rivers provide a huge diversity of food, prey, and shelter along their length. This diversity can be explained by the River Continuum Concept and stems from the many different and highly variable physical stream structures and parameters that evolve as a waterway increases in size. The River Continuum Concept is an ecological theory which posits that researchers must consider how the…

    Words: 1116 - Pages: 5
  • River Flow Alteration Essay

    Wide-spread recognition of escalating hydrological alterations of rivers has increased as a result of existing and projected future increases in water demands. The importance of a river’s flow regime for sustaining biodiversity and ecological integrity has been well studied over the last past 4 decades. This paper synthesizes the flow assessment methodologies to understand ecological responses to flow alteration and begins with a compilation of all historical methods to assess environmental…

    Words: 1226 - Pages: 5
  • Trinity River Culture

    water and culture have been incredibly interlinked. Since the beginning of settled life, humans have almost always recognized that settling by a body of clean usable water is necessary. Over time this need began to give birth to a deep respect for rivers, lakes and streams. Because water is such a critical element of life it was worshipped and appreciated for thousands of years by almost all cultures of the past. It has been a source of power and inspiration for thousands of years. The influence…

    Words: 1408 - Pages: 6
  • Riparian Zone

    to water quality and wildlife habitat. A riparian zone refers to stream bank system, including the stream, soils, flora, and fauna within it. Riparian buffers, specifically, are one of the most significant structures to implement along streams and rivers because of the structure’s many functions and abilities. Riparian buffer zones act as a canopy to shade and cool stream temperatures, as a filter strip to attenuate sediment, pollutant, and nutrient runoff, and as a wildlife habitat, all wrapped…

    Words: 2672 - Pages: 11
  • Hudson Valley Ice Age

    Connecticut River Valley and the Hudson River Valley got carved when the glaciers passed through their scraping rock. Both valley’s also got carved when the glaciers retreated and melted, and passed through the valley’s. The Hudson River formed when 10,000 years ago, the dam that held all the water broke, and formed the Hudson River. The Connecticut River also formed when another dam, the dam at Middletown Ct broke, and the river emptied very quickly, which formed the Connecticut River, an old…

    Words: 717 - Pages: 3
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