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    Philip Zimbardo Essay

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    Philip Zimbardo Short Intro + Approach Philip Zimbardo was born on the the 23rd of March 1933 in the Bronx, New York and was a professor at Stanford University. He is most known from his 1971 Stanford prison experiment and his research on the The Zimbardo Time Perspective Inventory. In 2012, Zimbardo received the American Psychological Association Gold Medal for Lifetime Achievement in the Science of Psychology. His approach throughout his studies within psychology was social cultural. Main Contribution to Psychology Phillip Zimabrdo’s most influential contribution to psychology was his 1971 Stanford prison experiment. This experiment had the goal to observe the impact of becoming a prisoner or prison guard. It is also known as the experiment of good vs evil because it questions whether goodness would triumph when good people placed in a bad, evil place. In this experiment he wanted to investigate further the impact of situational variables on human behaviour. Zimabrdo set up a mock prison in the basement of Stanford University's psychology building and then selected 24 undergraduate students (who had no criminal background, lacked psychological issues, and had no significant medical conditions) to play the roles of both prisoners and guards. While the original experiment was supposed to last 14 day it stopped after the 6th as…

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    According to psychologist Philip Zimbardo, situational variables are the variables in which human behavior is manipulated due to the circumstances that they are put in. Zimbardo stated that humans are more prone to influences caused by the external environment, or “situation” as they can sometimes overwhelm humans, tempting them to do things that are beyond imagination (Dreifus, 2007). Zimbardo further proved his “situational variable” theory by organizing the Stanford Prison Experiment in 1971,…

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    The Milgram experiment was done by Stanley Milgram to see how people would respond when an authority figure told them to do something that went against their conscience. The subject was told to give shocks, which went up in voltage, to a learner who was in on the experiment, unknowingly to the subject. Psychologists estimated that 1% of the subjects would go to the end of the board; however, 65% of the subjects did. This proved that people are capable of doing anything, as long as it comes from…

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    I’ll admit, I found this book very difficult to read, but not because of the vocabulary words or because it was a medium-sized book that from a distance can look long-winded to many people. It was very difficult to read the Lucifer Effects, by Philip Zimbardo because it made me angry, annoyed and mostly horrified. I wasn’t angry at the author, I was angry at humanity and how far they can get twisted in ideals, religion or just turning plain evil. I know that evil is out there, most people know…

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    Philip III's Achievements

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    Success of the Macedonian Empire Previous ruler Philip II, third son of Macedonian king Amyntas III, was last in line for the throne when his father died. His eldest brother, Alexander II died shortly after taking the throne so his other brother, Perdiccas III became king. During this time Philip was held hostage by the Greeks, where he watched and learned from the fighting tactics of the Greeks for almost three years before returning home to assist his brother in bringing back Macedonia to its…

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    Philip George Zimbardo is a psychologist and a professor emeritus at Stanford University who investigated how readily people would comply to the roles of guard and prisoner in a role-playing exercise that simulated prison life. Zimbardo was interested in finding out if guards were being reported for their brutality because of the dispositional hypothesis stating that the guards’ personalities and aggression is conflicting with disobeying prisoners or the situational explanation stating that…

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    Philip Zimbardo is well versed in the field of psychology with over 50 years studying and teaching while holding a PH.D. from Yale University. He is recognized for his famous Stanford Prison experiment and has well over 400 publications. Zimbardo has served as president of the American Psychological Association. Dr. Zimbardo currently lives in San Fransisco with his wife and had three grown children. Craig Haney, who worked as an understudy with Zimbardo, is a psychologist who studies social…

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    ethics as part of other generalized subjects. (Breaux, et al.) Either way, research of this nature poses questions to the effect of how influential the lack of education is on the future decisions of workers. For example, if all a student learns in school is how to make a profit, why should he or she consider anything else when making a future decision. Furthermore, the problem runs deeper than just college education. As an article in the Clergy Journal points out, society goes easy on kids when…

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    The Stanford Prison Experiment revolutionized how society views the relationship between prison guards and prisoners as well as how to conduct social experiments. The college students used by Philip Zimbardo adhered to their roles as the prison guards and gave a more authoritarian response to the students that played the role of the prisoners than Zimbardo hypothesized. These roles shaped the personalities of the prison guards as well as the prisoners. Social Structure and Personality studies…

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    Philip Zimbardo’s Prison Study Experiment The Stanford Prison Experiment was supposed to be a small two week study to view individual’s responses to being held captive, being dehumanized, and the overall effects of being in a situation portrayed as either a prisoner or guard. The study took place in 1971 and only lasted six days due to the effects it had on its participants. This experiment was highly controversial and inflicted mental pain to its participants. So where did it all go wrong? Why…

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