Peloponnesian War

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    History of The Peloponnesian War by Thucydides and the Iliad by Homer are both timeless accounts of war that also analyze human nature. Both authors divulge their belief about what comprises human nature through the observation of war and its effect on morality. Homer and Thucydides agree that emotion, specifically compassion, is the key to a human life. However, the authors differ on their definition of compassion. Thucydides sees compassion as a natural emotion felt among equals while Homer…

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    Leading a war always requires from the enemies a long period of preparation in order to be able to win and to gain freedom. Thus, Athens also wanted to become free, independent, and recognized by others. Thus, in order to build Athenian freedom, before the Peloponnesian War Athens had to conquer and enslave others. Only in this way could remind others about their power and to establish the freedom of Athens. However, the freedom that they were able to gain was immensely fragile and delicate…

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    Thrucydides in his “The History of Peloponnesian War” opens up the debate with the quote “ The Strong Do What They Have the Power to do and the Weak Accept What they Have to Accept.” The United States, which clearly has an extensive military and economic strength had the ability to impose their forces on Iraq. Furthermore, Iraq as a weak state had to accept the invasion. The United States had all in their power to invade Iraq. This statement of the strong doing what they have the power to do…

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    of Thucydides in The Peloponnesian War This international relations study will define the three images of war as theorized by Kenneth waltz to argue against the first image political realism of Thucydides in the Peloponnesian War. Thucydides was a general in the Athenian army that did not feel that a single leader or tyrant caused the war in the first image model, but in the clash of burgeoning nation states, such as Athens and Sparta, that reflects an anarchic global war scenario. More so,…

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    Giving only a cursory glance, one could thumb through Thucydides’ The Peloponnesian War and view it simply as a mere historical curiosity. Written about events occurring almost twenty five hundred years ago, one would assume this lengthy text could not serve any contemporary purpose. Modern mechanized arms have advanced far beyond the hoplite and chariot. Triremes more resemble a third world fishing vessel rather than an aircraft carrier or a destroyer. However, examining beyond these…

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    Throughout history, there have been many wars where it can be argued who won. During the times of the ancient world, one of the biggest arguments that can be made is whether Athens or Sparta and her allies won the Peloponnesian Wars. While there is substantial evidence to prove either side won the war, there is more information supporting Sparta and her allies as the victors of the Peloponnesian Wars. Sparta and her allies won the Peloponnesian Wars due to the strength of the Spartan military,…

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    Cameron Haberberger 10/20/2017 Humanities: Human and Divine Paper Walter Soffer After thoroughly reading Antigone by Sophocles and The Peloponnesian War told by Thucydides, it is clear both have much to consider when it come to the relation between the human and the divine. Although they both contain examples, Antigone holds a better explanation of the relationship in question. In the book, Antigone wants to bury her brother although she knew Creon ordered not to. Her reasoning for the…

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    When it came to war in Ancient Greece, their civilizations had the mountains to serve as barriers from enemies. The mountains also dictated the political character of Greece which was city-states. The city-states were run by the people and the people also got to pick who they wanted to lead them. The agriculture allowed civilizations to settle down, and farm their food, which led them wanting to expand their land. The only problem with the farmers wanting to expand their land was they wanted to…

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    country was run. Although Athens was an important city-state, it wasn't the only. Athens and a state called Sparta had a war called the Peloponnesian War for 27 years. Sparta came out victorious, but weakened. All of the city-states shared a common religion. Everyone worshipped the same gods, and the states came together once every 4 years to partake in the olympic games. Wars were even stopped by 3 months so people could safely travel to the games. They were one of the ways Greeks worshipped…

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    to desire and seek power, whether be it from money, strength or knowledge. They agree that having too much power changes people’s decisions and clouds their judgment. The Greek historian of the Peloponnesian War, Thucydides, describes a connection between power and justice in his book The Peloponnesian War. He gives evidence that having too much power and the desire for more overrules personal morals and principles of justice. The Roman satirist named Juvenal, on the other hand, believes that…

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