Nomenclature

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    Arguably one of the important decisions people have to make upon becoming parents is picking a name for their newborn child, a handle he can proudly use for the rest of his life. As the naming paradigm seems to be shifting towards more variety and creativity1, the artisans of new names have to pay attention to the thin line between unique and odd, culturally representative and obscure and powerful and offensive. If the impact of their choice was limited to themselves, the state would have no reason to intervene and limit them, but, unfortunately, this is not the case, as the one receiving the name is usually a young child, which is at the same time part of the group most likely to be influenced by names, as a large portion of children consider names a significant part of their identity and unable to pick for themselves. Therefore, in order to aid the name givers and protect children from possible social repercussions of names they received through no fault of their own, it is important that we adopt a law that restricts names that might have a negative impact on them, such as “Cholera”, “Loser”, “Fat Meat” or “Demon” due to their strong negative denotations. That being said, any form of legal limitations must not unnecessarily restrict the language 's potential to enrich the name spectrum through the same processes that gave us well established, beautiful names we use now – there is no reason to stomp benevolent creativity that poses little to no threat to the well-being…

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    that we do not speak language, but language speaks us. Specifically, Saussure (1916) argued against the “default setting” that is nomenclature, stating “for some people a language, reduced to its essentials, is a nomenclature: a list of terms corresponding to a list of things” (p. 97). I am arguing in Saussure’s defense against nomenclature by highlighting his objections, uncovering the problematic notions that language is arbitrary and conventional. Saussure argues that language is not just a…

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    Medical Record Setting

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    Writer, Sue Bowman provides basic information relating as to what the Systematized Nomenclature of Medicine – Clinical Terms is and how it is utilized in the following American Health Information Management Association journal article titled, Coordination of SNOMED-CT and ICD-10: Getting the Most out of Electronic Health Record Systems (Sue Bowman, 2005). The Systematized Nomenclature of Medicine – Clinical Terms supports the uniform core of general terminology for an electronic health record,…

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    understanding of other cultures. In the article Hocart calls for a solution to the issue of kinship extensions and offers the solution of “neutral notation” which would be similar to phonetic nomenclature. Precisely why this neutral nomenclature is so uncommon is also answered in the article; native words…

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    tail of the long chain which is “omega”. Thus, the fatty acid named from the methyl end in which the double bond is located at the third carbon (red region in Figure 1.1): thus the name is omega-3 fatty acids. 2) Examples There are three types of omega-3 fatty acids involved in human physiology are :- • α-linolenic acid (ALA) (found in plant oils) • eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) • docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) 3) Nomenclature Omega-3 fatty acid, ω-3 fatty acid, and n-3 fatty acid are all different…

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    Standardizing the Colors of Birds: Ridgway’s Color Dictionaries Robert Ridgway is the forerunner of modern ornithologist. The way he studied birds, by using professional language, classification and accountability made a big leap comparing to those ways of many amateur researchers in the same time period. At the same time, his standardization greatly promoted the professionalization of this field and related field. The books he private published— Color standards and Color Nomenclature is most…

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    ICT In Chemistry Essay

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    learning experience. There are many concepts that can be used to describe the motivational aspect of science teaching and learning. Computers have been used in education in many ways from the very beginning of their history. Several ways to analyses use of computer and ICT in education is govern the importance of one and all. Any particular technology is often treated as a particular tool to accomplish their task in more efficient way. There are so many topics which can be covered with the help…

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    Discuss the CPT guidelines, modifiers, and add-on codes. s Current Procedure Terminology (CPT) is the nomenclature used to report procedures and services performed by physicians. The guidelines in the CPT manual are presented at the beginning of each section and are used to appropriately report and interrupt the services and procedures that are found in that particular section. They are important as they give specific instructions for that section such as dealing with unlisted services or…

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    Pancreatic Cancer Model

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    virtually all organs (33)(34)(35). PDAC develops via a progressive model, determined by histological and genetic pathology (Figure 1.2) (36)(19). The precursor lesions that eventually develop into bona fide PDAC are termed pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasia (PanIN). There are three classifications of PanIN and are characterized by increasing cytological atypia: PanIN-1, are composed of mucinous columnar epithelial cells with little cellular atypia; PanIN-2, are composed of papillary (rather…

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    The Epigenetics Revolution: How Modern Biology Is Rewriting Our Understanding of Genetics, Disease, and Inheritance, written by Nessa Carey, is a uniquely constructed introduction to the world of epigenetics. Regardless of its recent emergence in science, Carey articulately ties in both historical context and scientific evidence to outline and support the developing knowledge of epigenetics. She uses scientific studies, advances, and even possible future developments of the field to engage and…

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