Nellie Bly

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    Imagine living in a place where you were sent for avail with a disability and it turns out to be a nightmare. A nightmare where you are residing in poor conditions, abused by a corrupt staff, and undergo dangerous operations on without your permission. Albeit many of us would never experience this, it was a cold-hearted reality for the mentally ill. Not only were the mentally ill treated horrible in “institutions” back in the mid-1800s to mid-1900s but outside they were not treated any better.…

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    Mental Illness In Prisons

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    thousands of people. A New York World reporter, Nellie Bly decided to disguise herself as a mentally ill person to view the treatment from a patient’s point of view. According to Bly, it was over-crowded and defeated the purpose of trying to give extra attention to those in need. She decided to publicize the fact that America needed a better health care system to support the mentally ill. Routine for the mental illness is the same for each individual (Bly,…

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    Joan Of Arc

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    but do your kids? Take the time this month to talk to them about what they are learning in history class and discuss some of the historic people and events in women’s history. Some lesser-known, but noteworthy women to learn about or discuss are Nellie Bly, Clara Barton, Eleanor of Aquitaine, Hypatia, and Mildred Ella Didrikson, just to name a…

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    Introduction Mental illness is a crippling disposition that affects 42.5 million adults in the United States every year. According to the National Alliance on Mental Health (NAMI), this is approximately 18.5 percent of the adult population. These conditions can range from slight antisocial disorder to severe schizophrenia. Because these debilitating conditions affect cognitive thinking, people who suffer from mental illnesses exhibit seemingly abnormal behaviors that are different from societal…

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    Secondly, a monumental impact of the Mental Health Care Revolution is an increase in the accessibility of health care for mental health patients. One of the reasons of this dramatic increase is a new idea that is gaining popularity called telepsychiatry, or telehealth. Simply put, telepsychiatry using technology, often video calling services, to increase the range of area that psychiatric services are offered in. The usage of telepsychiatry has been advertised as a way to increase access to…

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    The treatment of those who are vulnerable is infinitely telling about the values a country holds. The rapid decline of mental health institutions in the United States can be correlated to the rise in prison population and homelessness. America is a country with such advanced medical technology and supposed equal opportunity, and this would lead one to believe extensive resources are being poured into treatment and protection for those with mental illnesses, but this is not the case. With a…

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    was not the only notable speaker that the club had through the years. It is believed that Susan B. Anthony may have spoken with the club as she stayed in Grand Island for two months. There are no record to show that she visited just word of mouth. Nellie Bly, the woman who went around the world in less than 80 days, also may have spoken with the women. While her actual meetings with the 19th Century Club were not recorded, Maude Burrows was able to get an interview with her for the Kearney Hub.…

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    DBQ: The Progressive Era

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    DBQ The Progressive Era, 1900-1920, can be defined as a reform movement aimed toward urban and social change through improvements in the nation. This era stemmed from American industrialization and a population growth. Also, the Progressive Era emerged from past movements such as abolitionism, women’ rights, temperance, and the regulation of big businesses. Some of the main goals of the progressives included breaking trusts, ending political reform, bettering living conditions, and establishing…

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