Nellie Bly

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    In Ten Days in a Mad-House the author Nellie Bly took an undercover journalist assignment to pretend to be insane to investigate reports of brutality and neglect at an insane asylum. Nellie Bly convinced the doctors who examined her that she was insane. Nellie Bly experienced the hospitals horrible conditions firsthand: spoiled food; the patients being mistreated and abused; unclean and unsanitary conditions. Throughout history, there have been drastic changes in how mentally ill patients are…

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    184). In Chapter I, Nellie Bly presents her goals and mission plan to the reader. The reader quickly learns the importance of the judge in late nineteenth century America. Bly explains that there are only two viable ways to get admitted into Blackwell Insane Asylum; she can feign insanity at a friend’s house and recruit doctors sympathetic to her cause or she can go by way of the police courts (Bly 2). Bly chooses the latter method because it is quicker and more effective (Bly 2). Her method of…

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    come upon many obstacles. The obstacles in both stories in “What She Left Behind” by Ellen Marie Wiseman and “Ten Days in a Mad House” by Nellie Bly, gave us an understanding about the history of mental illness. These impediments were lack of clarity over idiom, miscommunication and understanding. When questioned about history being told to contemplate stories by Bly and Wiseman, were out of the ordinary to any individual who is captivated in acquiring knowledge on history of mental illness,…

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    Late 1800s Dbq

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    Some the muckrack were Nellie bly, Susan Anthony and Jacob Riis. Nellie bly exposed insane asylums by making herself go crazy, by doing so she starved herself, locked herself in a room, and pulled out her hair. The only was she go in was by faking her craziness. When she went into the asylum, she had a reporter to show how badly the people there were being treated. Nellie bly put it in a newspaper for people to see how bad the treatment was. Another…

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    but today it stills has the same effect. Some examples of muckrakers of today and in that time are Nellie Bly, Jacob Riis, Upton Sinclair, Ida B. Wells, and Samuel Hopkins Adams. Every person listed above helped or solved a problem that people saw as a negative effect in the present time or the Progressive Era. Bodys One of these people that was a muckraker in the Progressive Era was Nellie Bly. She helped to improve the condition in asylum for mentally ill people and…

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    Throughout much of the history of medicine in the United States women have been marginalized, whether as patients or as practitioners of medicine themselves. Journalist Nellie Bly and writer Charlotte Perkins Gilman are no strangers to this alienation as their works “Ten Days in a Madhouse” and “The Yellow Wallpaper” critique the treatment of women and female mental health patients in the male dominated medical establishment. These works expose how doctors, specifically male as during this time…

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    In chapter two of “The New Colossus,” written by Marshall Goldberg. Nellie Bly got an offer in the biggest newspaper called “The World” and she had a new assignment which was investigating Emma Lazarus’s death. Nellie Bly was a women journalist, who wrote about the Bellevue Hospital Asylum. Her story made an impact on the practice of journalism and made a change in the asylum. Her work was admired by Pulitzer, the owner of the World, in which she got a byline and got her involved in Emma…

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    “I have watched patients stand and gaze longingly toward the city they in all likelihood will never enter again. It means liberty and life; it seems so near, and yet heaven is not further from hell,” quoted by Nellie Bly in her work Ten Day’s in a Madhouse. Bly’s work was a reflecting piece towards the treatment of the mentally ill in mental hospitals, which was a place to help their illness not make it worse. This work can be analyzed from a reader’s point of view of Marxism and New Historicism…

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    Mental Health Papers

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    One in four adults in the United States (61.5 million) is affected by a mental illness (McEnaney). Of the 61.5 million adults suffering from a mental illness, only 40% (24.6 million) are getting the proper treatment for it (Nieves). Additionally, 1/3 (250,000) of homeless people in the U.S. suffer from serious mental illness, and that number increases every day (Nieves). While health care for mentally challenged individuals in the United States has improved since colonial times, their care today…

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    her contributions there were only thirteen asylums in the United States. After her travels there were 123, of she personally was a key factor in opening 32 of them (van Hartesveldt). Around the time of Dix’s success, a journalist with pseudonym Nellie Bly wrote a report on treatment of mentally ill people in one of the asylums of New York City. She spent a week in a psychiatric hospital pretending to be a patient there. She wrote a book exposing the derogatory treatment of all the patients in…

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