Moksha

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    what a person will be re-incarnated into once re-born. In contrast to Christianity, once you have sinned, you may not ask for forgiveness from the deities, unless the sin was extremely minute. Shiva the destroyer, and mother goddess Devi are example of Gods whom one many devote themselves to in hopes of salvation. For the devotee, “Release from rebirth is important, but not if it means merging with the impersonal Brahman in the manner of the Upanishadic way of knowledge” . Devotion in Hinduism should not be done just for the sake of salvation. Devotion should be done through a deity that the devotee personally connects to and wishes to merge with to achieve union with Brahman. Hindus are in a constant cycle of death and re-birth, known as Moksha, until they are released into eternal life with the creator Brahmin. Although both Hinduism and Christianity’s view on afterlife have similar aspects, the pathway to achieve it, and the level of devotion to God are very different. Conclusively, both Christianity and Hinduism are seen to have similar overall aspirations, but distant ways to achieve these goals. After analyzing both Christianity and Hinduism’s ability to follow a moral code, their role of women, and their beliefs surrounding the afterlife, it is clear that the differences…

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    Moksha And Nirvana

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    What is reincarnation? Reincarnation is a belief that the soul, upon the death of a body, would come back to earth in another form or body. The concept of moksha and nirvana has their own concept of liberation for Hinduism and Buddhism. Hinduism and Buddhism both the religion of India. Yet within these concepts, there are many different understandings of these concepts, but Moksha and nirvana both have similarities that both relate to enlightenment. The word Moksha refers to liberation,…

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    Moksha In Hinduism

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    Moksha, as a concept in the religion of Hinduism, is the ultimate goal in life. Moksha is also known as liberation or salvation. Moksha is the ultimatet goal because Samsara or rebirth happens before the liberation. In order to attain Moksha, there is the cycle of rebirth as also known as Samsara. The maintenance of world order can be achieved through Dharma while Moksha is the release from the world. Karma, as the cause-and-effect to the Samsara, is doing good or well in your duty or social…

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    Reincarnation In Buddhism

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    Hinduism Reincarnation plays a very important role in the Hindu religion. It is through this, so one can reborn after reborn until achieving Moksha or liberation. At the state of Moksha, one is with the universe. However, if one fails to achieve Moksha in one life, then one will continue onto the next life through reincarnation cycle. This cycle is also known as Samsara. One is trapped in this Samara cycle until reaching Moksha. If one is being reborn, then one is reborn into a new random…

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    Afterlife In Hinduism

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    practices of afterlife in Hinduism, I will look at Karma, Samsara, and Moksha. Karma plays an important role in what devout Hindus follow and how they make their decisions. Samsara is a repeating cycle that continues in a person's life cycle and is affected by the decisions made during their lifetime. In this paper, I will argue that the most significant point of Hinduism is breaking the cycle of samsara to achieve moksha. In order to do this, I will explore the concepts of karma and samsara in…

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    The Mooksha Of Hinduism

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    The word ‘Moksha’ is derived from ‘moksh’ which can mean emancipation or liberation etc. Sometimes it might also refer to salvation but salvation may not do justice to the word since it has a kind of Christian connotation to it rather than a Hinduism one. But it is frequently used to translate the word moksh. So instead of it meaning only freedom from sin, it includes freedom from the human life itself. In soteriological terms, moksha means freedom from samsara, the cycle of birth and death.…

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    Dualism In Hinduism

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    The Upanishads are a collection of texts that outline some of the core philosophical concepts of Hinduism. Amongst these are moksha, dharma and advaita. In Sanskrit, moksha means ‘release’ from the cycle of birth and death (samsara) - it is freedom from attachment to materialism in life and detachment from the human world. There are multiple ways to attain moksha, which will be discussed in this essay. Dharma, in sanskrit, means ‘duty’ or ‘ethics’- these are the duties and morals followed by…

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    they have very different ideas. At the surface they may seem similar to an outsider but when really studied it is obvious that they are two totally separate concepts. They have fragments of their thoughts and rites that are the same, but it is important to understand that they, as a whole, are not. Hindus believe that everything has a soul and that when something dies the soul is reincarnated. This means that death is not the end, but rather a part of the cycle of samsara. The only way…

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    Karma In Hinduism

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    everything in the universe is connected. A few of these teachings are karma, samsara, Brahman, Atman, and Moksha. The most basic and most common of these teachings is Karma (kamma). When I think of karma the first thing that comes to mind is someone saying “karma will get you back”. What is karma? In Hinduism “karma” are our actions and how these actions effect the world around you. Not only does karma effect this life but future lives. This brings us to the Hinduism believe of samsara. Samsara…

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    Four Values Of Hinduism

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    liberation, one divine reality with many Gods, and beliefs about the divinity of the natural world to promote more informed ecological awareness. There are numerous diverse conditions regarding Hinduism, but mostly every Hindu is identifiable. In fact, the law of karma determines the nature of one’s incarnation in Samsara, which is continuing the cycle of death and rebirth. This cycle ends with liberation, or Moksha, the final release from the trials of Samsara. Above all, Moksha is believed to…

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