Mary Bell

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    Working in an office, specifically in the front desk, to many is a mundane, straight forward, pretty repetitive job. What could be so awful about working in an office, right? I unfortunately work at a taxicab company and let me start of by saying that there is nothing mundane about this place. On a day to day basis, I find myself struggling to remain positive, stress-free and most of the time end up failing at keeping my spirits up. After viewing the movie, What the Bleep Do We Know?, I saw a…

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    Industrialism In Canada

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    conceived theories on how post-industrialism is evolving and what it means in today’s society, a few of which follow. In the early 1970s, American sociologist Daniel Bell was the first to recognize how the structure of work had been shifting from agrarian to manufacturing to a service sector orientation (Krahn et al, 2012, p. 26). Bell theorized that power in society would shift from those who owned/controlled assets, to those who held knowledge and could solve problems (Krahn et al, 2012, p.…

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    There once was a little girl, she had long hair and big eyes; and she loved to play outside in the dirt. When she was six her mother told her to go inside and play with the dolls, that she would get hurt playing outside. She was taught that her job was to take care of a family and raise children of her own one day; she was taught that the world was not a place for her. Despite the instilling of this message in many girls, few managed to speak out against it; one of these few was Sylvia Plath. In…

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    A very prominent theme throughout the book, The Bell Jar by Sylvia Plath was that thoughts haunt people which creates a bell jar around people, trapping them in the vortex of madness which is their mind. In the beginning of the book Esther contemplates what it would be like to be “burned alive” through electrocution (1). This thought essentially comes back to haunt Esther when she talks to Hilda who is “glad [the Rosenbergs are] going to die (99),” which contributes to the accumulation of…

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    have ever wanted; the opportunity to spend a month in NYC editing a national magazine. One might ask what in the world possibly be the same about them? The main characters in the novels The Bell Jar by Sylvia Plath and The Catcher in the Rye by J.D. Salinger be similar than thought possible. Both Ester from the Bell Jar and Holden from The Catcher in the Rye face many trials that helps them to develop their own views on protection of innocence, mental illness and death which results in them…

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    Fig 2, Rodin, A, 1882, The Kiss Fig 3, Parker, C, The Distance Similar to the idea of boundaries is concealment. Sculpture artist Judith Scott had Down syndrome and was severely deaf; she used yarn, wool, and other fibres, which may suggest a way of communicating to the public themes of loss, separations, relationships and new beginnings. Her practice consisted of abstract cocoons whereby objects are wrapped up in colourful threads, from crimson red, blues, cream, purple and black. Seeking…

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    Dr. Seuss once asked: “Why fit in when you were born to stand out?”, a question still relevant today. Why should we conform to society’s expectations when we were born to escape them? In The Bell Jar by Sylvia Plath, Esther Greenwood suffered from depression but suppressed how she really felt in hopes of fitting in, which caused her to sink into a further depression. Only when Esther grew out of her desire to fit in was she able to find a way out of her depression. This brought on a valuable…

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    person, just as Esther does. “Esther’s father was the patriarch of the family; in confronting his grave she confronts all of the different pressures she feels from life and the patriarchy.” The domesticated wilderness: Patriarchal Oppression in The Bell Jar by Allison Wilkins. Without a father figure she felt empty and it prevented her from finding happiness which she tortures herself with suicidal attempts. When she underwent her first electro shock session with Doctor Gordon she had a…

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    The Wire Scene Analysis

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    gets involved in fights or deals drugs personally. One of the other positions in chess that is highly rated is the queen. The queen in chess can move anywhere it wants, is actively involved in strategies and the plot or game. In The Wire Stringer Bell most accurately represents the queen in chess. Stringer is the man that does all the dirty work for Avon (the king). Whenever there is a problem or confrontation Stringer is the one that takes care of it. The Queen is a position that you can work…

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    Charlotte Perkins Gilman’s short story, ‘The Yellow Wallpaper’ and Sylvia Plath’s novel, ‘The Bell Jar’, scrutinises how both women, the unnamed narrator and Esther, become mentally unstable. Both protagonists exploit their real life situations in their story and novel to emphasise how being a woman living in a patriarchal society has caused mental breakdowns. Moreover, they make attempts to explore and understand their suffering of depression and the possible ways to overcome it. The short…

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