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    What is Gender Gap in Offender Sentencing? Disparity in gender offender sentencing revolves around female defendants irrespective of backgrounds reciving less sever sentences as compared to male defendants in the same category of offence as well as having similar backgrounds. The disparities also touch in the disagreements on whether women are actually favoured as compared to men in offender sentencing. Therefore, gender gaps in offender sentencing can be explained by the pervasiveness found in…

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    Judges Vs Federal Courts

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    The federal court system is quite large today. Despite its current size, the United States Constitution requires only one court but allows Congress to create more as needed. That is the foundation for the current multilevel court structure. In these federal courts, important decisions are made by appointed judges concerning federal legislation and constitutional rights of citizens. Therefore, it is an important duty when officials go through the selection of Justices and Judges. The following…

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    Often Madison wrote to his college friend, William Bradford, and spoke of the religious persecution he was seeing, in one letter stating,” That diabolical, hell-conceived principle of persecution rages among some. . . . There are at this time in the adjacent county not less than five or six well meaning men in close jail for publishing their religious sentiments, which in the main are very orthodox. . . . So I must beg you to . . . pray for liberty of conscience for all.” (Wadman, p._) Madison’s…

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    The Puritans followed the Bible as closely as possible. The magistrates referred to one scripture in the Bible time and time again as to see how to deal with the accused witches, “Thou shalt not suffer a witch to live” (Exodus 22:18). Since the Puritans followed the Bible so strictly, they believed all accused witches that had been proven guilty were to be hanged or burned at the stake. The Puritans also believed North America to be the Devils country. They began to fear anything new and…

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    Crime Vs Hate Crime

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    Every country has its own laws and ways of dealing with crime. In the United States, we are used to the way our laws work and how the courts function. Other countries are used to the way their laws work, however, when you compare the U.S. with other countries there are many differences that are interesting to look at. Many countries struggle with certain crimes that we may not have a very big problem with. You could also face serious jail time in other countries where the U.S. may only give a…

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    Athens was a true democracy because the citizens have the liberty to vote on just about everything, excluding the magistrates, which were elected by a lottery. Some may argue that it wasn’t a true democracy because women, children, and metics weren’t allowed to vote, thus making Athens an oligarchy, which was proven in Wealthy Hellas by Josiah Ober, but this argument is invalid, only because at the time women were considered to be lower than men, children did not know better, and metics most…

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    belief in the literal interpretation of scripture, caused colonists living in British North America to view anyone living outside the religious and social boundaries as potential minions of Satan. This notion perhaps best explains why in 1692 the remote location of Salem Village in Massachusetts became the focal point for a series of witchcraft accusations that would reverberate across all of colonial New England. In a manner complicit with the writings of Cotton Mather, Salem Village’s…

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    Few theoretical fields can compare with the amount of internal conflict that plagues postcolonial theory: a semmingly constant stream of debates centring on internal rather than external elements. One such debate can be located between the ‘first wave’ and ‘second wave’ critics of the theory, who are often engaged with one another in a rather antagonistic manner. A simple explanation of the stances of each wave can be stated as such: first wave criticism challenges the colonial status quo,…

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    Navarun Atraya, 20131778 1. Why does plato insist that philosophers must be kings? Discuss it in the context of the Socrates’ death. (10 points) Plato considered that knowledge is absolute power and that only the “best” should rule. Political rule should be the rule of knowledge. Plato’s definition of a philosopher-king was a king who would have a grasp of the true and enduring, would not fear death, would be fair-minded, gentle and sociable, brave, temperate, and would work to preserve the…

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    of the A. Because of the way Hester took pride and effort into making the A on her chest visible and pretty, Pringle also says "Like the elaborate embroidery she has worked into the letter, this claim serves to disassociate the symbol from the magistrates and to link it more directly to herself." This is what Hester is known for, her humble beauty with her A. No one can take that away from her. Hester makes her A beautiful. Embracing it, making it a part of her. Being confident with something…

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