Karl Barth

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    Cone And Jinson Analysis

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    he maintains the basic dialectical structure that interprets eschatology as the crisis of history. I Robert Jenson: Narrative Overcoming of Crisis The early dialectical theology of Karl Barth and Rudolf Bultmann represent crisis as the historical condition—perhaps even the ‘fallout’—of divine revelation. Crisis names the consequence of the revelation of alien righteousness, wherein the world encounters the eschatological dialectic of divine judgment and grace. Revelation is opposed to history, on this account, and never becomes history; it is always a question posed, which exposes historical contingency before God’s reality. God’s being is never given in the world, nor can God be possessed as a datum of human knowledge. Robert Jenson inherits dialectical theology’s schematics, and remains committed to working constructively from them in his Systematic Theology. Materially, for Jenson, the fundamental virtue of dialectical theology’s project is its priority of eschatology, and therefore its critical opposition to protological, Hellenistic thinking. This conception is warranted because it is true to the arc and concern of the biblical narrative. According to Jenson, however, it is not sufficient simply to claim with Rudolf Bultmann, that God is eschatological; nor is it adequate, with Karl Barth of Romans II, to argue that all theology must be thoroughgoing eschatology discontinuous with history. While Jenson values these eschatological emphases as thoroughly biblical, they…

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    The Barmen Declaration was the most important document that the Confessing Church had drafted. Although it did not directly address the Aryan paragraph nor Nazi antisemitism, it condemned the “false doctrine” of the nazified theology of the German Christians and the unbiblical synchronization of church institutions. This document served as confession of what they believed to be the proper understanding of the Reformation Confession of Faith. While Karl Barth was the predominant author of the…

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    and spread of communism during the late 1960s is what led Martinez’s to center his works around the Cuban Revolution. According to Dr. Martinez, “Socialism seemed to be the answer of capitalism and imperialism”. Dr. Martinez required his works to be “academically rigorous as well as create provisional and mental metaphors that portray the kingdom of God as the main message”. The part that interested me the most was the comparison of Cuba to Israel in terms of similar ambitions as well as the…

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    theologians Karl Barth and T.F. Torrance. First off, the method a person uses to study theology is important. How someone goes about studying God can ultimately affect how much they learn about the creator of the Universe. As far as methods go almost all real theologians agree that…

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    Reeves argues that we look at God in a very one-dimensional way and that humanity tends to look at God and project qualities that only exhibit a part of God. (pg 20) Quoting Karl Barth Reeves argued that even Hitler knew who God was, but that Hitler missed the full point that “… God is almighty, but he wanted to make very clear that mere might is not who God is.” (pg 20). God goes far beyond just power, and Reeves moves on to show that God doesn’t just flex muscles at us in hopes of us loving…

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    “Karl Barth, the greatest Protestant thinker of the twentieth Century, visited the United States only once”. (Worthen, 15) (1) I found this an interesting opening sentence. Isn’t this based off author Worthen’s own bias? Granted, he was a huge influence on theology, but perhaps depending on the lens, might there not be others that were thought of as the “greatest”? Might not Albert Schweitzer for example, as a missionary and religious philosopher not be considered a great theological thinker as…

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    At the climax of Voltaire’s novel Candide, the main character Candide’s wife Cunegonde is enslaved in another country against her will. “A Bulgarian captain came in, saw me all bleeding, and the solder not in the least disconcerted. The captain flew into a passion at the disrespectful behavior of the brute, and slew him on my body.”(17) This image portrays Cunegonde being sexually abused and rescued by a member of the Bulgarian Army. This depicts the common theme between all of the female…

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    Ethnic Identity Stage

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    In the beginning, there was only Adam and Eve, one people and one identity. At the eleventh generation came Noah’s and that was when we saw the first signs of different people groups. The people all spoke one language on the earth and when they tried to build a tower to reach God, God humbled them by confusing their language so that they did not understand each other and was forced to abandon the project. People dispersed over the face of the earth and hence we saw the separation of people, the…

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    J.D. Robb is a pseudonym used by Nora Roberts. One hundred and twenty-four of her novels have ranked in the Times bestseller list, including twenty-nine that debuted in the number-one spot. Some of her books have made it to movies such as Sanctuary and Magic Moments. Nora Roberts has made a name for herself in the romance shelf in stores. She has a book series named In Death that has over forty books. Most of those are best sellers. If you want to read a great future, homicide cop book Naked in…

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    Falsificationism Karl Popper asserts that the scientific status of a theory is derived from that theories potential for refutation. Theories outlining experimental results that (if observed) could refute the theory are classified as scientific. Theories that lack this content are classified as pseudoscience. Popper uses this distinction to preface his scientific view: falsificationism. Under this view, science exists as a system through which we can logically falsify theories. This stands as…

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