Jessica Simpson

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    Page 7 of 19 - About 189 Essays
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    Have you ever watched the cartoons Doc McStuffins and Paw Patrol? Doc McStuffins and Paw Patrol are two recent cartoon shows. They both were published around the same time. Girls mostly watch Doc McStuffins because lots of them want to become doctor or nurse one day. Boys watch Paw Patrol because many of them probably want to become a firefighter or a police someday. Doc McStuffins and Ryder have many things in common. They are both great helpers and they both have animals in their cartoon show.…

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    Satire In The Simpsons

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    The Simpsons has become a staple of American life since its first release in 1989. This long lasting cartoon comedy achieved the true essence of satire by capturing the moment of stupidity among today’s stereotypical American ‘everyman’. By using a wide range of satirical devices such as: parody, irony, sight gags, absurdity and black humour, The Simpsons develops and enhances brilliant and distinct characters in order to create the fascinating and hilarious satire. Therefore, The Simpsons…

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    Design In regards to intertextuality, Teddy from my picturebook is the Humpty Dumpty used in the television show Playschool. This served two purposes: Humpty is known to be an incredibly unlucky character, creating doubt in the readers mind even at the beginning of the story that Teddy is the lucky one; and it also creates a connection to Australian children (and even adults) that watch Playschool. Salience and colour were used hand-in-hand in my picturebook through the colour red: it is one of…

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    Nuclear Family Sociology

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    social norms. The opening of the Simpsons criticizes the influence of television by illustrating the family gathering to watch tv. As a result, the Simpsons portray rigid gender roles. In the book The Simpsons, Satire, and American Culture, Matthew Henry indicates that the Simpsons “critiques the ideological norms surrounding gender in American culture” (79). The show criticizes America’s patriarchal society by portraying a dysfunctional nuclear family. The Simpsons is a satire comedy that…

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    Groening’s classic The Simpsons, or the more recent twist Family Guy created by Seth Macfarlane. The Simpsons and Family Guy are American comical cartoons that share many similarities and differences. Although the two shows portray a dysfunctional American family and have a similar way of delivering humor, they both contrast in their targeted audience and characters. The first and most noticeable resemblance is that The Simpsons and Family Guy’s humor can…

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    Lorna Simpson is an American artist born August 13, 1960 in Brooklyn New York. Information about Lorna Simpson can be found in the textbook on pages 21-23. Information about Simpson was found on www.lsimpsonstudio.com, www.moma.org, and biography.com. Simpsons’ main work is photograph-and-text art. Simpsons’ Momentum was recently displayed at the Addison Gallery of American Art located in Andover, Massachusetts. Her art work on display from September 20, 2014- January 4, 2015. Another artwork of…

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    The Simpsons are often looked at as simply a comedy show but in reality the television program is so much more. The Simpsons have been around since 1989 and from the beginning of it’s conception the writers have been commenting on the world around them. The program started a revolution in the television world and has sparked many copy cat shows. The show can be considered one of the greatest show in the history of television. This not simply because it creates laughs on the surface but under the…

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    computer screens, but rather, we’d use to gather about the tube and sift through the various channels before settling on something agreeable. One particular program often piqued enough interest in everyone to keep its place on the screen; The Simpsons. The Simpsons offered something for everyone. There was always a character you can relate to; whether it’s the underappreciated and overworked housewife, the blue collared father who despite always having the best intention can’t seem to get…

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    The Simpsons is a long running animated comedy focused on a family in Springfield. The show is a depiction of working class life in a small town. The show portrays much sociological concepts of American culture and society. Some being, race/ethnicity, sex/gender, deviance, and social groups. The writers of The Simpsons have shown many examples of race and ethnicity. First example, in the episode The Color Yellow, Lisa finds a diary written by her great-great-great-grandaunt, Eliza Simpson.…

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    The Simpsons Analysis

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    Groening picked the characters of the Simpsons by using people he grew up with. The parents in the Simpsons are named Homer and Marge, the same name that Groening's parents have. He named Lisa and Maggie after his two younger sisters. Groening thought it would be too obvious if he named the oldest son after himself, so Groening decided to name the last child Bart which is an anagram of brat. Homer's father also received the same name as Groening's grandfather, Abraham. Groening returned to…

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