Jean-Luc Godard

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    Accompanying with three films indeed marked a new beginning in French cinema and then in the wold, The 400 Blows By Truffaut and Breathless by Godard, as well Hiroshima, mon amour (1952) by Alian Resnais. I will try to explain part of this movement in cinema and what made it so famous. The main person in this amazing movement is Jean-Luc Godard who he is a French-Swiss film director, known for his prominence in the New Wave film movement in France during the 1950s and 1960s. In this report I will try to bring some short informations, facts and thoughts by other sources from history of cinema to present reders of this articleinterest and also giving them some idea about this powerful movement in history of cinema in the world and especially after War World 2. According to Robert Sklar in his book An International History of the Medium said: “As it turned out, the strongest response to Hollywood‘s challenge during the 1930s came from French. In one sense, French‘s leading role was obvious; in another, paradoxically, surprising”. (Film. Robert Sklar. P.235)…

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    Jean Luc Godard Analysis

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    Despite the protagonist wanting nothing more than to be a rugged, hard-boiled film noir hero, Jean-Luc Godard depicts Michel as a foolish man who lives to emulate Humphrey Bogart. As Michel travels through his life of crime, jumping from one bad decision to the next, Godard captures the intricacies of Michel’s character and dedicates each layer of the film to conveying them. Like Michel, Godard is not afraid to take risks, and he uses compositional elements in unconventional ways to deepen the…

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    conscious movement it left a legacy with films like À bout de soufflé/Breathless (written and directed by Jean-Luc Goddard). French New Wave rejected the idea of a traditional story in films – they didn’t follow the structure and the narrative. The French filmmakers wanted the audience to react to their film like they would react in real life and wanted the films to be realistic as possible. The dialogue was spontaneous and as close to real life as possible,…

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    Band Of Outsiders

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    8 Henry Price COM 320 Research Paper 1 A Band of Outsiders ? A Link Between Godard and Tarantino Introduction Intro to Godard Getting to know Godard: An Intro to the Historic Filmmaker Intro to Tarantino Getting to know Tarantino: The Bad Boy of Cinema Influences of Godard Societal Outsiders (Unconventional Characters) & Unique Plots Alphaville, Band of Outsiders, Pulp Fiction, Kill Bill Vol. 1 & 2 Conclusion A Link Between Godard and Tarantino (Final Thoughts) Getting to know…

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    narrative of the film works as Kar-Wai plays with the lose structure instead of having one story he has two. To keep these two stories relevant, he has almost the same theme of Love through both stories with officer 223 being still in love with his ex-girlfriend and growing feelings for the woman in the blood wig. Also, officer 633’s flight attended girlfriend leaving him and him falling in love with the Faye. Each time the stories intersect the viewer is given a better view what and where each…

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    was a movement based off of realism and focusing on creating films that are centered in some form of reality. Some of this was done by using natural lighting, natural sound, and creating scripts and making changes on the fly. Jean-Luc Godard was best known for this rather than choose to polish and create clean films he created films that essentially were flawed. This happened as a result of him and other creators choosing to improvise scenes and make the movie as they shoot. Many saw Godard’s…

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    The Mood For Love Analysis

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    Wong Kar Wai is probably the most innovative and avant-garde director to come out of Hong Kong. As part of the second New Wave of Hong Kong cinema, Wai moved far away from the traditional, Jackie Chan and Shaw Brothers style of films, which focused on action, and explored more substantial themes, icnluding human psyche, politics and the social conditions in Hong Kong. His aesthetics are quite similar with Jean-Luc Godard and the French Wave, in general, particularly because he also took apart…

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    themselves into a singular figure, having his individual presence act as the driving force that would define and enrich the film; in this film, the obvious case would be John Lennon due to his rebellious nature, his cheeky attitude, and his palpable influence he has over the other members of the group. However, Lester remains loyal to each of the four members, allowing its concise screen time to be equally shared, where a noticeable sense of growth could be felt with each passing second, and…

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    French New Wave Analysis

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    the director: writers, great thinkers and even Hollywood actors, through countless references in style, mise-en-scene or even dialogue. Roy Armes notes this constant intertextuality, and how it was in essence, a way for these educated artists to make sense of life, and to trade, through the code of careful references, their opinions and film preferences (French Cinema 175-6). In Breathless, through “the homage to Bogart, the posters of The Harder They Fall , the quotation from The Enforcer when…

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    Photography is the key element of mise en scene that determines how an audience will interpret the visual information in film. Orson Welles used the photography of his 1941 film Citizen Kane to emphasize aspects of the film he wanted viewers to focus on, and to remove non-essential information from the frame. This was accomplished through various camera tequniques including manipulation of angles and proxemity. Approaching the end of the film there is a scene just after Susan (played by Dorothy…

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