Jar

Sort By:
Decent Essays
Good Essays
Better Essays
Amazing Essays
Best Essays
    Page 1 of 50 - About 500 Essays
  • Good Essays

    This ceramic piece is Shino-glazed stoneware with slips done in 1996. The jars are down in desaturated colors. Two of the jars are browns with a hint of red mixed in with the other jar being a crème color. There are imprints of a stick on each jar which were filled in with a rich brown. The jars themselves were created with a small neck on top but no other movement throughout, not even a visible base for the jars. This piece did not catch my ear at first viewing but I was intrigued by the name, Three Kitchen Jars, the alludes to the fact it is used in their kitchen, which Kevin Flicker says in his artist statement that it the reason he creates most pieces. “I frequently make pots for the specific needs of the kitchen. The practicality of these pots made them more beautiful to…

    • 967 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    The Bell Jar Plath

    • 935 Words
    • 4 Pages

    The Bell Jar is written by Sylvia Plath and published by William Heinemann Limited in London in 1963. This is the only novel written by American author and poet Plath and was first published under the name Victoria Lucas. This semi-autobiography based in New York City in 1953 tells the story of Esther Greenwood and her journey in the city and road down depression. Plath focuses on theme such as restricted roles of women in the 50’s in America and with sub-themes like success equals career.…

    • 935 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Better Essays

    Depression In The Bell Jar

    • 1325 Words
    • 6 Pages

    Causes and Impact of Depression in The Bell Jar “The longer I lay there in the clear hot water the purer I felt, and when I stepped out at last and wrapped myself in one of the big, soft white hotel bath towels I felt pure and sweet as a new baby” (Plath 49). The aforementioned “purity” is attributed to transformation, the washing away of the dirt as she descends into a cleaner self. Sylvia Plath’s The Bell Jar morphs this idea of sanity and purity twisting it to make us all question if a glass…

    • 1325 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Better Essays
  • Good Essays

    Bell Jar Metaphor

    • 737 Words
    • 3 Pages

    The technique of metaphor itself is one of repression as it is an imposition of a particular constraint as it is as way of saying something to mean something else without saying it directly. Thus, this metaphor could be a way of Plath critiquing society because of the way it represses women. It portrays how stifling society is for women to try and pursue what they want and Esther seems to be thankful that she has been able to escape the bell jar around society and start a new life that is not…

    • 737 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    Qualia In The Bell Jar

    • 769 Words
    • 4 Pages

    Plath’s content reactions were recorded throughout her experiences at a hospital in which she was confronted with things that the average person may find completely gruesome and morbid. While observing mental patients and dead fetuses held in jars, she becomes increasingly curious and fascinated. Plath’s strange perception and obsession different from the typical person becomes obvious to readers when she responds to a question by saying, “Wonderful, I could see something like that every day”…

    • 769 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Better Essays

    Women In The Bell Jar

    • 1659 Words
    • 7 Pages

    Pressure on Women in the 1950s Can Lead to Depression In the Bell Jar by Sylvia Plath the nineteen-year-old college student, Esther, wins guest editorship at a fashion magazine called Ladies’ Day. Although she seems to be living her dreams in New York, her plans unexpectedly change. Plath uses the magazine, relationships with men, friends, marriage, and her mother to illustrate that social pressure on women in the 1950s could lead to depression. Plath shows how Esther’s job at Ladies’ Day, the…

    • 1659 Words
    • 7 Pages
    Better Essays
  • Good Essays

    Family In The Bell Jar

    • 508 Words
    • 3 Pages

    In the book “The Bell Jar” by Sylvia Plath the theme is family before anything. Family is the most meaningful concept on earth. Your family cares, loves, and protects. Without your family you would be nowhere. Having your family will help get past your troubles, support, and help succeed in the future. First, in the beginning of the book, Esther did not have a connection with her family. “My own mother wasn’t much help” (39). Esther’s mother was callous on her. Her mother had to take care of 2…

    • 508 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    Thesis For The Bell Jar

    • 545 Words
    • 3 Pages

    The Bell Jar The Bell Jar, by Sylvia Plath, is a realistic, and shocking novel of a woman falling into the grips of insanity. The novel is a semi-autobiography, which means some of the things that happened in the book did happen. Sylvia Plath, will play the character Esther Greenwood, while as all the other characters had been people she met that gave her an idea of that character. The Bell Jar, is about a 19 year old girl named, Esther Greenwood, who undergoes a series of events before finding…

    • 545 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Better Essays

    Sexism In The Bell Jar

    • 1272 Words
    • 6 Pages

    The Bell Jar was written around the 1950’s and 1960’s, when women were expected to adhere to specific societal norms. Often, these norms included being a mother of children, staying at home cleaning or cooking, and being an obedient wife. Society placed high importance, along with these expectations/behaviors, on the women while they were at home or in public. Society accepted women who met all these factors. Esther, a character in The Bell Jar, and Sylvia’s autobiographical figure, lacks all of…

    • 1272 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Better Essays
  • Good Essays

    The Bell Jar by Sylvia Plath and Thelma and Louise (1999) are both similar in that they are both strong feminist texts, addressing and discussing the issues of women’s rights in early and modern society. To represent this issue, as well as others within the text, both employ the use of characterisation, the development of the protagonists, and themes. Characters in the two texts play an important role in expressing the limited freedoms and rights of women and the societal conventions they are…

    • 1076 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Previous
    Page 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 50