Japanese American

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    In 1942, Roosevelt ordered the Executive Order 9066, which resulted in the internment of Japanese American citizens.There are many reasons in which it was not justified, such as that Japanese Americans assimilated to American culture which proves that they wanted to be apart of America. They even wanted to bring their families with them, that shows that they want to show their new life to their families. Most of all, the internment of Japanese American citizens was not justified because there was little evidence that they were a threat. Japanese Americans assimilated to American culture, which shows they are willing to do anything to be apart of America. They took jobs as factory workers and sugar beet farms to help with the economy and have…

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    the Japanese Americans became very hard following Executive Order No. 9066. Once the war ended, the Japanese returned to their homes and faced housing, employment, and racial discriminations. Overnight, the life of the Japanese Americans changed significantly when over one hundred and ten thousand people had to leave their homes and move to detention camps. The reasoning behind them having to go to detention camps was because of racial prejudice and war hysteria. After living in such harsh…

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    California with Japanese ancestry. Those living on the West coast were relocated to desolate places far away from the Pacific Ocean and placed in camps with other Japanese Americans. There were a few reasons for the relocation of Japanese Americans in the middle of February of 1942 and up until 1945 when some were just barely beginning to be released. The reasons for their forced relocation away from the West coast were: negative racial and social attitudes towards them, followed by the…

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    1946, more than 110,000 Japanese Americans were forcibly relocated to concentration camps with the justification of military necessity after the Japanese launched the devastating attack on pearl harbor in 1941. However, it is of debate to which extent was the degree posed by Japanese-American equivalent to the treatment of Internment they received from the US government. Orthodox Historians who regard the internment decision to be wrong, suggests that the degree of threat posed by…

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    research studies on the topic of LGBT characters in media, but I decided to make my study unique by studying how they are understood by a certain cultural group. I chose Japanese Americans because Japan and America have very contrasting views and distinct understanding on the LGBT community in society. With this, my audience based research question was the following: how are Mitch and Cam understood by the Japanese American community? To answer the question I created, I chose to interview one of…

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    The Japanese American Internment was forced relocation. Franklin D. Roosevelt issued a presidential proclamation which required the immigrants from other World War II countries to register with the Department of Justice (Staff, 2009). For example, Italy, Germany, Japan. Once registered, there was a Certificate of Identification for Aliens of Enemy Nationality (Staff, 2009). This was said to be a follow up of the Alien Registration Act of 1940 (Staff, 2009). We will talk about executive order,…

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    Japanese-American Relocation This article gives a broad overview of the time when the Japanese-Americans were relocated. Two months after the bombing of Pearl Harbor. The Executive Order 9066 was signed, ordering all Japanese-American living on the west coast to ten internment camps. Normal family structure was upended in the camp and the living conditions were not the greatest. The Japanese-Americans were allowed back to the west coast in 1945-46. In 1988, Congress gave restitution payments…

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    thousands of Japanese Americans, regardless of United States citizenship status, received orders to evacuate their homes and businesses. Sparked by rising fear and anxiety of the American people after the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor, a United States Naval base in Hawaii, the U.S. government relocated Japanese Americans to remote areas on the West Coast and in the south, isolating them in internment or relocation camps. With no actual evidence supporting the creation of internment camps, the…

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    Japanese-Americans’ Fight to Retain a Dual Identity During WWII Since the United States was founded in 1776, the nation has remained a country of immigrants, who journey to America in search of a promising future, freedom, and opportunity. Unfortunately, throughout the United States’ history racism and xenophobism have existed against immigrants. American citizens have exhibited hostility toward immigrants, in fear the newcomers will steal their jobs and threaten the prevalent culture of their…

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    called “War Relocation Camps”. It’s where they forced 110,000 Japanese-Americans to live there. Oh, by the way, they weren’t actually for war relocation, it was for Japanese Internment. In the 1940s, Japanese-Americans were considered loyal to the United States. That was until “Japanese naval and air forces attacked the United States…

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